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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckmeister2 View Post
    Man, I hate to be the only dissenter, but will give my .02 worth. First, you will always notice an improvement in braking when you replace worn out pads or rotors, which I think is what many people responding are feeling. The supposed "upgrade" to drilled and/or slotted rotors results in very little, if any, improvement. Maximum braking surface with discs results from maximum contact with the pads and rotors. Reducing any contact surface, especially drilling, reduces the total surface that can be contacted, and may actually result in poorer braking. Slotting is preferable over drilling, because if not done correctly, drilling will lead to early distortion of the rotors. If you have your factory rotors properly surfaced, and use the highest quality pads you can get, you will be getting the maximum stopping power you can from original size rotors. The only way to significantly decrease the stopping distance of your truck is to increase the size of the rotor and pad, so there is more contact area. A good example of this would be installing a complete wilwood system, which runs anywhere from about $2500 to $5000, depending on what you choose. Yes, some of their systems are drilled and slotted, some are slotted, and some are flat surfaced. That is determined by application, and we are talking serious considerations, not just driving one's truck around town. Just fyi, I have used many d&s rotors, and currently run slotted rotors. After I install and break in new brakes, I take my truck to a lonely road (I try to use the same road each time) and set the cruise on 60, then, using a marker to measure from, do a max power brake at 60 mph, and measure the stopping distance. I have never seen any of my rotors make more than a few feet diff either way, but have seen the best pads make 10-15 feet diff, and that is worth it.
    now this is what I like ! this is all very good info for those that don't understand. when I was in the transportation business we would test the braking rates also change the brake pad material and tweak brake pressures for better brake control . the reason for this is if you start to slip/slip then the ABS gets activated by the computer/PCM and you loose in you braking distance which is not good.

    ever see what those BMW brake rotors look like ? pure brake control. the bigger the rotors/calipers the greater the brake effort and control.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by RayVoy View Post
    @j cat, usually, I agree with everything you write, but I need to question your last response.

    It is my understanding, that the ABS is composed of a hydraulic control unit (HCU) and a brake control unit (EBCU), they may be in the same case. The EBCU uses the ABS speed sensors to monitor wheel speed differences. When it detects a difference in wheel/hub/driveshaft speed, it commands the HCU to operate a valve to apply a wheel brake.

    In the newer vehicles, the EBCU probably "talks" to the PCM so that the PCM can adjust the engine power to provide additional assistance with braking.
    the ECBM electronic control brake module gets tested by the programed control module PCM at every start. on many of our vehicles the relay contacts get burned up and then you get the ABS light to come on with just starting the vehicle and never even braking or moving the shift lever from park.

    the PCM receives the speed signals from the tranny and the front axles. then with the programing decides how it is going to act/control the vehicles failure indicators/brake components.

    when you get a slide condition the pulsing is from the ABS pump and valve dump/apply of brake pressure as you keep your foot pushing down on the brake. when the speed frequencies all agree then the power to the ECBM from the PCM is shutdown to condition normal.

    what I seen happen is these ABS valves can get stuck in the open no pressure position then you cannot stop. very scary . this can occur if you push back the back caliper pistons with the bleed screw closed . then all the dirty brake fluid fouls up the ABS valves in the control unit.

    GM last I checked does not have a brake fluid replacement cycle . this is not good . most manufacturers of high priced quality performance vehicles do have a replacement period for these fluids.I have replaced my fluid 3X since 2000. this may be why my brakes still work very good even when towing.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by buckmeister2 View Post
    Man, I hate to be the only dissenter, but will give my .02 worth. First, you will always notice an improvement in braking when you replace worn out pads or rotors, which I think is what many people responding are feeling. The supposed "upgrade" to drilled and/or slotted rotors results in very little, if any, improvement. Maximum braking surface with discs results from maximum contact with the pads and rotors. Reducing any contact surface, especially drilling, reduces the total surface that can be contacted, and may actually result in poorer braking. Slotting is preferable over drilling, because if not done correctly, drilling will lead to early distortion of the rotors. If you have your factory rotors properly surfaced, and use the highest quality pads you can get, you will be getting the maximum stopping power you can from original size rotors. The only way to significantly decrease the stopping distance of your truck is to increase the size of the rotor and pad, so there is more contact area. A good example of this would be installing a complete wilwood system, which runs anywhere from about $2500 to $5000, depending on what you choose. Yes, some of their systems are drilled and slotted, some are slotted, and some are flat surfaced. That is determined by application, and we are talking serious considerations, not just driving one's truck around town. Just fyi, I have used many d&s rotors, and currently run slotted rotors. After I install and break in new brakes, I take my truck to a lonely road (I try to use the same road each time) and set the cruise on 60, then, using a marker to measure from, do a max power brake at 60 mph, and measure the stopping distance. I have never seen any of my rotors make more than a few feet diff either way, but have seen the best pads make 10-15 feet diff, and that is worth it.
    When I replaced and upgraded the brakes on my truck. They were already brand new with ceramic pads. I got improved braking performance out of my upgrade

    98% of big brake kits come with drilled and/or slotted rotors. I certainly don't disagree with your points. In fact they make good sense.
    Another thing to consider is weak shocks a springs. Worn shocks will increase your stopping distance by an average of 10-15 feet on their own. Now, being that your truck is fairly new, I'm sure your springs are in good shape or at least I hope they are

    As for the above brake fluid interval comment, my brake fluid gets changed with every brake pad change. Old brake fluid becomes acidic therefor eating away at runner seals and hoses. So, changing the fluid frequently is a VERY good idea
    Last edited by BurbanMan; 08-10-2013 at 11:03 AM.
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  3. #13

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    Gm does recommend brake system inspection every 12 months, part of that inspection is to check the fluid, some shops will use test strips to check the fluids water content and acidity but most just look at the fluid for color, by time it looks dirty the damage inside has already begun, thats whats making it look dirty.
    I normally change fluid every 24 mos. On resale vehicles I change the fluid as part of sales prep since its a good bet many of them have never had a fluid change.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbplus10 View Post
    Gm does recommend brake system inspection every 12 months, part of that inspection is to check the fluid, some shops will use test strips to check the fluids water content and acidity but most just look at the fluid for color, by time it looks dirty the damage inside has already begun, thats whats making it look dirty.
    I normally change fluid every 24 mos. On resale vehicles I change the fluid as part of sales prep since its a good bet many of them have never had a fluid change.
    you are right on the fluid color . when it looks off color it is too late.

    keeping my vehicles as long as 17 years I only once had caliper issues . that vehicle the 2000 silverado had defective rear calipers. the caliper pistons were bell shaped. as the pads worn down the piston would stick.

    failure mileage 20,000 1.5 yrs old.

    my 1983 original calipers and brake cylinders no brake failures . replacing brake fluid is most always not done. when you work in a repair shop this is all revealed everyday with how some owners will run down there brakes to metal on metal.

  5. #15

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    Unfortunately that's a problem with my wife's Tahoe. We bought it and the fluid is brown.

  6. #16
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    do the brake fluid replacement. I would go to a shop with the proper ABS activating machine and do the GM brake fluid replacement bleed procedure .


    with that done you should notice better braking .

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by j cat View Post
    do the brake fluid replacement. I would go to a shop with the proper ABS activating machine and do the GM brake fluid replacement bleed procedure .

    with that done you should notice better braking .
    I'll be replacing the fluid as well so pretty muchan entirely new brake system (fluids, rotors and pads) so I should notice a big difference. Not that I'm having any problems right now, I just want to upgrade.
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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by McClintoc View Post
    I'll be replacing the fluid as well so pretty muchan entirely new brake system (fluids, rotors and pads) so I should notice a big difference. Not that I'm having any problems right now, I just want to upgrade.
    after you do all this brake work you will feel the difference. with brakes slowly loosing the brake effort it does so over a long time and you get used to how hard you push down on the brake pedal.

  9. #19

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    Buck is very dead on IMO, what looks cool or is used on a track for a very focused purpose or application is not always the best choice for a truck that tows or is just going stop light to stop light. Track cars/trucks do torture the parts on them but longevity is not always the prime concern. X number of laps are put on them and worn parts are replaced after the race is over, It's why they have sponsors. Fleet parts are usually beefier for a reason.
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  11. #20

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    I ordered my parts. I basically went with premium OE replacements instead of performance rotors.

    @Kapelusprime Those are my thoughts exactly. My truck is no where near a race truck and it doesn't do any towing so I don't really need any super awesome brake system. OEs are plenty so I decided to save the money.

    Thanks to everyone for all the input!

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