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  1. #1

    Default rocker panel repair...blasting

    k I have a 03 silverado and i need to blast the cab conors and rockers. gonna have to cut most out and blast. Is there anything special on how we do it or paint rust block etc? whats a good place to get repair panels? if this is wrong area please move Thanks all!
    2004 Chevy Silverado z71, second owner

    1994 Pontiac Trans Am GT, yellow, Hard top (yup its a GT):glasses:

  2. #2
    Sr. Engineer Dana W's Avatar
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    Dec 2011
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    Chuluota, Florida
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    Default

    LMC Truck might very well have some panels. A 2003 should not be in really bad shape unless you live here in Florida. Just media blast enough to see where all the hidden rust is. This won't remove all the deep rust. Then follow these two rules. Rule #1. Cut all the rust out. Rule #2. Cut all the rust out. Otherwise, it will just come back in a couple of months. Hopefully you can weld sheet metal. Here is a broad description of the process. The procedure is to usually use the new panel as a template, draw around it closely with a sharpie, and cut the old panel away just a tiny bit inside the sharpie line. In other words, cut the old metal away while trying to just leave the line you drew showing on the edge of your cut. The panels are welded in edge to edge with the original panel with no voids, ground down as smooth as possible without thinning the panels out. That part will invariably involve some grinding and filing, and maybe some cutting to get them to fit closely. It is not possible to weld wide gaps in sheet metal. Then whatever wrinkles that are left can be leveled with a thin coat of body filler. Prime and paint both sides of the repair. I say that's a broad description because there is a good deal of art involved in replacing body panels. You'll need some specialized tools too, like cut-off wheels, power metal shears, files, special drill bits for drilling out spot welds too. Sometimes the new panels can't be used as a template because their shape will prevent you from holding it up against the old one close enough to accurately trace it. In those cases, you will have to make templates out of stiff poster board that are shaped exactly like your new panels, and then trace those templates. Sometimes you will have to make several templates for one panel if the shape is very irregular. Well, that's enough from me because I have never done it, I have just seen the process a few dozen times.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dana W View Post
    LMC Truck might very well have some panels. A 2003 should not be in really bad shape unless you live here in Florida. Just media blast enough to see where all the hidden rust is. This won't remove all the deep rust. Then follow these two rules. Rule #1. Cut all the rust out. Rule #2. Cut all the rust out. Otherwise, it will just come back in a couple of months. Hopefully you can weld sheet metal. Here is a broad description of the process. The procedure is to usually use the new panel as a template, draw around it closely with a sharpie, and cut the old panel away just a tiny bit inside the sharpie line. In other words, cut the old metal away while trying to just leave the line you drew showing on the edge of your cut. The panels are welded in edge to edge with the original panel with no voids, ground down as smooth as possible without thinning the panels out. That part will invariably involve some grinding and filing, and maybe some cutting to get them to fit closely. It is not possible to weld wide gaps in sheet metal. Then whatever wrinkles that are left can be leveled with a thin coat of body filler. Prime and paint both sides of the repair. I say that's a broad description because there is a good deal of art involved in replacing body panels. You'll need some specialized tools too, like cut-off wheels, power metal shears, files, special drill bits for drilling out spot welds too. Sometimes the new panels can't be used as a template because their shape will prevent you from holding it up against the old one close enough to accurately trace it. In those cases, you will have to make templates out of stiff poster board that are shaped exactly like your new panels, and then trace those templates. Sometimes you will have to make several templates for one panel if the shape is very irregular. Well, that's enough from me because I have never done it, I have just seen the process a few dozen times.

    I was looking online there is so many panels! I was hoping to cut out the rust and blast... i was under the impression i could go over whats there and weld the seams, what all panels are needed? there is a inner, outer... on and on. should i just cut out what is bad and patch from there or is there a more complete panel that i could cut out of the truck and pop in it.... mostly assembled.... idk i have never been down this road. thanks!

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