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  1. #1

    Default CNG conversion in the States

    Well, fuel's getting ridiculous... I'm seriously considering converting my 91 Suburban to run off of CNG in addition to gas. However, I haven't been very fruitful in turning up useful information to do the conversion. My SBC 350 has the TBI on it, and from what I've read, some tricking has to be done with the computer to make it think the injectors are still running when the CNG takes over. So, anyone have some useful links to where I can get a kit to convert the truck to CNG. Also, how much would this cost? Then of course I gotta find out how to fill 'er up. I'm thinking I might have to get some sort of CNG compressor.... Ugh.. Well, any help is greatly appreciated anyways...
    Christopher

    1991 Chevy Suburban 1/2 ton 2WD w/ chevy SBC 350-3/4 ton drivetrain upgrade w/4.10 gears 200K miles
    2005 Saturn ION-2 Stock 277K miles
    1982 Bronco, 1993 Bronco (sold), 1971 M35A2 Deuce and a Half



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  2. #2

    Default

    i was looking into this as well for a friend that wanted to run gas/propane but nothing yet........sorry.....mike
    Michael Collins
    1993 4X4 Suburban
    many other toys as well

  3. #3

    Default

    just fired off an email to sales@technocarb.com

    Greetings,



    I am interested in obtaining a kit that will convert the 5.7L 350CI throttle body injection Chevrolet Small Block in my 1991 Chevrolet Suburban to run off of LPG. From what I have read and understand, it appears that there will have to be some controller in the system to "fool" the truck's computer into thinking that the fuel injectors in the throttle body are operating. I'm looking to convert it to dual-fuel so I can still use gas. Any assitance in locating the appropriate kit and a dealer (preferably local, but can be over the internet if neccesary) than can suppy the kit is greatly appreciated. Thank you very much for your assitance in this manor.
    We'll see what happens. It seems like more people get their parts/kits from technocarb...

  4. #4

    Default

    Oh, I think I've decided to go with LPG rather than CNG if for no other reason than it seems to retain more power and MPG, and I should be able to obtain LPG easier than CNG around here.... can anyone say household 500 gal tank???

  5. #5

    Default

    This is a popular topic on the search engines right now, anyone else think about a project like this?

    Open to everyone, jump in if you have anything to add.

    Steve
    10 Chevy Traverse LT AWD
    02 Chevy Trailblazer LS (110K+ miles - loaded except for 4WD - WRECKED!)
    99 Chevy Cavalier LS (105K+ miles - commuter car)
    78 Chevy Suburban Silverado (454, 3/4 ton)
    62 GMC 3/4 ton Pickup (350 police interceptor)

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  6. #6

    Default

    what does LPG and CNG stand for??
    PETE
    95 GMC Sierra 2500
    3" Body Lift, 33" Goodyear MTR's
    5.7L 350 TBI Edelbrock SDT Exhaust, Flowtech Headers, K&N Intake
    Sold :(
    1999 Jeep Cherokee, 3" Rustys lift, 33" BFG MT's, locked, armored: Rolled :(
    2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited. K&N Intake, Custom Kolak Exhaust


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  7. #7

    Default

    LPG:
    Liquefied petroleum gas (also called LPG, LP Gas, or autogas) is a mixture of hydrocarbon gases used as a fuel in heating appliances and vehicles, and increasingly replacing chlorofluorocarbons as an aerosol propellant and a refrigerant to reduce damage to the ozone layer.

    Varieties of LPG bought and sold include mixes that are primarily propane, mixes that are primarily butane, and the more common, mixes including both propane (60%) and butane (40%), depending on the season—in winter more propane, in summer more butane. Propylene and butylenes are usually also present in small concentration. A powerful odorant, ethanethiol, is added so that leaks can be detected easily. The international standard is EN 589.

    LPG is manufactured during the refining of crude oil, or extracted from oil or gas streams as they emerge from the ground.

    At normal temperatures and pressures, LPG will evaporate. Because of this, LPG is supplied in pressurised steel bottles. In order to allow for thermal expansion of the contained liquid, these bottles are not filled completely; typically, they are filled to between 80% and 85% of their capacity. The ratio between the volumes of the vaporised gas and the liquefied gas varies depending on composition, pressure and temperature, but is typically around 250:1. The pressure at which LPG becomes liquid, called its vapor pressure, likewise varies depending on composition and temperature; for example, it is approximately 220 kilopascals (2.2 bar) for pure butane at 20 C (68 F), and approximately 2.2 megapascals (22 bar) for pure propane at 55 C (131 F). LPG is heavier than air, and thus will flow along floors and tend to settle in low spots, such as basements. This can cause ignition or suffocation hazards if not dealt with.

    CNG:
    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is a substitute for gasoline (petrol), diesel, or propane fuel. It is considered to be a more environmentally "clean" alternative to those fuels and it is much safer than other motor fuels in the event of a fuel spill: natural gas is lighter than air, so it disperses quickly when leaked or spilled.

    It is made by compressing natural gas (which is mainly composed of methane (CH4)),to less than 1% of its volume at standard atmospheric pressure. It is stored and distributed in hard containers, at a normal pressure of 200–220 bar (20–22 MPa), usually in cylindrical or spherical shapes .

    In response to high fuel prices and environmental concerns, compressed natural gas is starting to be used in light-duty passenger vehicles and pickup trucks, medium-duty delivery trucks, and in transit and school buses.

  8. #8

    Default

    wow thanks tim!!

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tbplus10 View Post
    LPG:
    Liquefied petroleum gas (also called LPG, LP Gas, or autogas) is a mixture of hydrocarbon gases used as a fuel in heating appliances and vehicles, and increasingly replacing chlorofluorocarbons as an aerosol propellant and a refrigerant to reduce damage to the ozone layer.

    Varieties of LPG bought and sold include mixes that are primarily propane, mixes that are primarily butane, and the more common, mixes including both propane (60%) and butane (40%), depending on the seasonin winter more propane, in summer more butane. Propylene and butylenes are usually also present in small concentration. A powerful odorant, ethanethiol, is added so that leaks can be detected easily. The international standard is EN 589.

    LPG is manufactured during the refining of crude oil, or extracted from oil or gas streams as they emerge from the ground.

    At normal temperatures and pressures, LPG will evaporate. Because of this, LPG is supplied in pressurised steel bottles. In order to allow for thermal expansion of the contained liquid, these bottles are not filled completely; typically, they are filled to between 80% and 85% of their capacity. The ratio between the volumes of the vaporised gas and the liquefied gas varies depending on composition, pressure and temperature, but is typically around 250:1. The pressure at which LPG becomes liquid, called its vapor pressure, likewise varies depending on composition and temperature; for example, it is approximately 220 kilopascals (2.2 bar) for pure butane at 20 C (68 F), and approximately 2.2 megapascals (22 bar) for pure propane at 55 C (131 F). LPG is heavier than air, and thus will flow along floors and tend to settle in low spots, such as basements. This can cause ignition or suffocation hazards if not dealt with.

    CNG:
    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is a substitute for gasoline (petrol), diesel, or propane fuel. It is considered to be a more environmentally "clean" alternative to those fuels and it is much safer than other motor fuels in the event of a fuel spill: natural gas is lighter than air, so it disperses quickly when leaked or spilled.

    It is made by compressing natural gas (which is mainly composed of methane (CH4)),to less than 1% of its volume at standard atmospheric pressure. It is stored and distributed in hard containers, at a normal pressure of 200220 bar (2022 MPa), usually in cylindrical or spherical shapes .

    In response to high fuel prices and environmental concerns, compressed natural gas is starting to be used in light-duty passenger vehicles and pickup trucks, medium-duty delivery trucks, and in transit and school buses.
    Good Info!

  10. #10
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    Default

    Back during the 70's in the middle of the first gas crisis I got a ride in a Pinto with a propane conversion. Ran great and it was fun to drive through the roadside emissions testing that the Calif. Air Resources Board used to do. They would stick their tailpipe sniffer in and then you would see a puzzled look on their faces. As I remember is was a conversion using an IMPCO carb. Check out these current day rock crawlers using propane. propanecarbs.com

    Local NBC affiliate covers the CNG option.
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