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  1. #1

    Default Silverado CV joint problem?

    I'm driving a 2000 Silverado 1500 Z71 with push button 4X4 (165k miles). This winter has been particularly harsh and I have had to use my 4X4 a little more than usual. Recently, I pulled out of a parking spot in 4X4 and noticed a low grumble/grinding noise (no clicking or popping) as I turned the wheel all the way to the right . It also felt like the truck was a little jumpy and it had a hard time going forward. So, I tried turning the wheel all the way to the left and had the same result. When I'm in 2wheel, life is good, but turning slowly in 4 wheel sounds and feels horrible. I crawled under to look at the CV's and noticed that the rubber boots were all in great condition with no grease on the outside of the boots. This makes me think that the CV joints are okay. We recently had a ton of rain and I went through some puddles with my right tires. Does anyone think it's my CV joints or could it be something else? Thanks for any input!

  2. #2
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    driving in 4wd locked not auto on solid dry pavement will give this result... If your on road surfaces with snow and dry clean pavement use auto 4wd... use any 4wd as little as possible unless your in a snow road surface condition..

    I myself do not use any 4wd on/in the rain ....I do have truck tires ...if you have those passenger tires then you might need the auto 4wd.. I never had traction issues in rain with the vehicle in 2wd...

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks for the response! I wasn't using my 4x4 in the rain, but I noticed this after the raid had come down and covered the roads in puddles. I was wondering if maybe the water washed away greese from the joints somehow. I don't have a way to look under the rubber boots on the CV's, the clamps look like they can come off but will be ruined in the process.

  4. #4

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    The point @j cat is trying to make, is that a wet surface is not loose, or slippery, enough to use 4WD. When you turn your vehicle, the 4 wheels are turning in different circles (the turning diameter of each wheel is different). This is not a problem when in 2WD, the differentials are designed to allow one wheel to turn in a different circle than the other wheel. When you use 4WD, one front wheel is locked to one rear wheel. The wheels want to turn in different circle, but they can not.....you have them locked together. the result is a lot of bucking (called crow-hopping) and a lot of noise from the components.

    Use 4WD only on loose (gravel), or slippery (ice, or snow) surfaces
    Ray

    '09 Avalanche LTZ - Black
    '05 Envoy XL (sold)

  5. #5
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    If you use any 4wd selection in the rain all the time and make hard turns you will feel this as mentioned by RayVoy [crow hopping] effect and other bad sounds.

    you say no issues in 2wd so what you have is a normal condition when in 4wd with what your doing in your operation so when this occurs easy on the throttle and slowly increase speed when making turns in any 4wd selection... I would check your front diff and transfer case lube for level and condition...

  6. #6

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    Thanks everyone for the information! I noticed the sound and "crow-hopping" when I was pulling out of an icy parking spot in 4WD, but there were spots of dry pavement, which makes perfect sense when the crow-hopping analogy is referred to. I haven't used my 4WD much since this is my first winter with the truck (I used to drive a 2WD Explorer). I'll check all of my fluid levels just to make my truck happy. I didn't know about the separate turn radius' and it makes perfect sense. I have not used my 4WD in any situation where there was a lot of traction, other than when I hit the dry spots on the turn I talked about above, so don't worry, I'm not out running in 4WD abusing my truck. Again, thanks for the info guys!

    Nick

  7. #7

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    I agree with the other posters, it is normal. To answer you CV joint question, Yes, you can cut the clamp off and peel the boot back to look inside. Then just buy a replacement clamp. BUT, I would not suggest doing it. If you were to pull the shaft and feel stiffness or "crunchyness" when moving while off the truck then I would just replace the shaft. They are around $60. There are not any parts inside that are serviceable.

    1995 Silverado 4x4
    6" BDS Suspension Lift-3" Body Lift-Add A Leaf in rear -Trailmaster SSV Shocks-Duel Steering Stabilizer Kit -AirAid Cold air intake-
    4.56 Gears with Detroit Auburn Locker-Pro-Comp Traction Bars with duel shocks-Aluminum Skid Plate Kit-38.5" x 16.5" Mickey Thompson Baja Claws-Constant Dropping fuel gauge

    2005 Yukon XL Jet Power Programmer, Bilstein Shocks, Bilstein rear springs, Helwig Anti-sway bars, EGR Window Visors, EGR Hood Shield, Denali Headlights, Headlight harness upgrade, GE NightHawk Bulbs, White Night Rear lighting system, Russell Braided SS brake lines, PowerStop Brake pads, PowerStop cross drilled and Slotted Rotors, http://www.gmtruckclub.com/forum/sho...5-GMC-Yukon-XL
    2002 Silverado ext cab 2wd (Sold)
    2003 Yukon XL (Totaled)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pulla1nr View Post
    Thanks everyone for the information! I noticed the sound and "crow-hopping" when I was pulling out of an icy parking spot in 4WD, but there were spots of dry pavement, which makes perfect sense when the crow-hopping analogy is referred to. I haven't used my 4WD much since this is my first winter with the truck (I used to drive a 2WD Explorer). I'll check all of my fluid levels just to make my truck happy. I didn't know about the separate turn radius' and it makes perfect sense. I have not used my 4WD in any situation where there was a lot of traction, other than when I hit the dry spots on the turn I talked about above, so don't worry, I'm not out running in 4WD abusing my truck. Again, thanks for the info guys!

    Nick
    replacing the drive train fluids every 40,000 miles is recommended. transfer case , front/rear diff's , and the transmission fluid + filter...with this done and the use of the correct fluids this should prevent any future damage.

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