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  1. #1

    Default Silverado wheel weights contacting caliper

    Went to go rotate my tires the other day, and when I did the swap I started driving, I noticed a ticking noise that you can hear <45 mph. So I took the wheels off and noticed my break calipers had scratches on them . Note and please don't laugh even though I am to myself right now typing this, but I never rotated the wheels properly on my prior set until I was rotating my tires/changing oil at my friends house, so I'll just leave it at that So I swapped the wheels back and called Firestone who had installed/balanced my new tires (all four). Brought it back to them and they said that I don't have enough clearance between my rims and my caliper for the weights to clear. I do not have stock rims. My setup is Eagle Alloy 140 Series 17" wheels with on 275x75xR17 Firestone Destination A/T's on them. The guy at Firestone told me to "grind" some of my caliper down to allow the clearance for the wheel weights. He said they used the thinnest "sticky weight" they can have used. Going back to rotating the tires, not only did I notice this ticking noise, but the trucks stability/alignment was definitely off. Can someone head me in the right direction? I don't think "grinding" my brake calipers is a good idea, and I actually had plans of plasti-dipping my rims or repainting them, so what am I supposed to do in that case?

    *I would've posted a picture, but if your wondering the scratches aren't that bad, but obviously still bad enough to hear a ticking sound.

  2. #2

    Default

    Grinding a little metal off the back of a brake caliper is a very popular method for clearancing smaller aftermarket wheels.
    You basically want to smooth out the caliper and only take a small amount of material.
    Make sure you dont grind to deep into the metal to cause a rupture of any fluid passages that may be there.
    And dont grind to deep so as to affect structual strength.
    Like I first said smoothing it out, The metal can be polished afterwards for a cleaner look.

    As far as alignment or handling issues how long has it been since the tires were last rotated and what condition are they in?

  3. #3

    Default

    did you rotate them front to back on the same side, or did you "X" them (left front to right rear, right front to left rear). I am pretty familiar with that tire, and although it is non-directional, after quite a bit of use, it will develop directional wear. It is important to rotate tires front to rear, same side, only. That might account for some of the different feel you experienced if you "X" rotated them.
    Las Vegas, NV...2001 Silverado 1500 LT Z71 Stepside X-cab, 171,000 miles, 5.3, cat-back duals, leveling kit, 3.73, 17" rims, more to come...

  4. #4
    Legend

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    Default

    file down the caliper can be done as explained here.. no big deal. I would check that the caliper is secure and that the caliper pins are not loose or move too much as this can be a problem as you have.. also the rear wheel bearings may be a little worn and this will also give this effect...so check it all out..

  5. #5

    Default

    I would think you would need at least 1/16 " clearance. Don't forget that things like aluminum and steel change dimension as temperature changes.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tbplus10 View Post
    Grinding a little metal off the back of a brake caliper is a very popular method for clearancing smaller aftermarket wheels.
    You basically want to smooth out the caliper and only take a small amount of material.
    Make sure you dont grind to deep into the metal to cause a rupture of any fluid passages that may be there.
    And dont grind to deep so as to affect structual strength.
    Like I first said smoothing it out, The metal can be polished afterwards for a cleaner look.

    As far as alignment or handling issues how long has it been since the tires were last rotated and what condition are they in?
    Ok awesome thanks man. It's been about a year since the tires were put on and I never rotated the tires "front to back" in that time...yes yes I know embarassing but its the honest truth haha. Right now that fronts probably have 60% left and the rears have 75% left. I would mainly notice it if my truck hit some decent bumps, not to mention my steering wheel wasn't completely straight and the wheels were. Swapped the tires back to normal and driving went back to normal.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Thank you j cat I'll make sure to take a look at that while I'm doing that.

    Silverado002 I think that might be the case because I tried the swap last month before I made it back on to these forums and it was probably 15-20 degrees outside and these tires got mounted in summer conditions.


    Quote Originally Posted by buckmeister2 View Post
    did you rotate them front to back on the same side, or did you "X" them (left front to right rear, right front to left rear). I am pretty familiar with that tire, and although it is non-directional, after quite a bit of use, it will develop directional wear. It is important to rotate tires front to rear, same side, only. That might account for some of the different feel you experienced if you "X" rotated them.
    When I tried rotating them this time which is the "right way" I did not X them, I went Rear Left to Front Left, Rear Right to Front Right. I can see if I X'd them and I was experiencing problems. Thanks

  7. #7
    Legend

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    Default

    when I rotate the tires are X ...what happens is the tires on the right side/passenger side wear more than the left. the softer the tire the more you see this effect. so rotating the front right to the left rear is how I do it. I rotate every 15,000miles ..my tires have 60,ooo miles on them now with 30 % tread left. I plan on getting new rubber this summer..

    also my vehicle you cannot tell / see any difference in the tread wear...between tires..

    if you rotate and you get steering wheel vibs , then the wheel weights fell off...

    tire shop workers are sloppy. the wheels need be cleaned perfectly to ensure the stick on's stay on...

    with new wheels there may have been a coating that caused them to not stick !

    wipe the wheels down in the back side of wheel with paint thinner to ensure a good clean surface..before you get the tire shop balancing done.

  8. #8

    Default

    My buddy at his home shop... uses a method that goes inside of the tire. Not certain what it is called but is his preferred method. I'm having him balance my winter rims/tires this way.
    2009 Chevy Silverado 2500HDLT 6.0L w/ Towing Package, Dick Cepek GM8 Rims, Dick Cepek FC II 33X11.50R17,RKSport Ram-Air Hood(Functional), Lazer Lite Aluminum Tonneau Cover, Road Armor Stealth Bumper, PIAA Lighting, Diablo Trinity Tuner, Diablew Custom Tune, BullyDog Cold Air Intake, American Racing Headers w/highflow cats, Corsa Performance Sport Exhaust, Custom Striping, Black Bowties front and rear, Fuel Grille Inserts, Recon Headlights, Readylift Shocks, Readylift Upper Contol Arms, 2" Blocks in the Rear..

    Future Plans: HD Tie Rods, Under hood upgrades, Crower Camshaft and possibly electric fans.

  9. #9

    Default

    Timtomb is he using the internal beads?
    Guys doing a lot of off roading or using tires larger than 36" like beads since they cant fall off and when running larger tires most shops refuse to balance them since they normally dont have the correct equipment, have problems getting the tire balanced, or problems getting the weights to stay on.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tbplus10 View Post
    Timtomb is he using the internal beads?
    Guys doing a lot of off roading or using tires larger than 36" like beads since they cant fall off and when running larger tires most shops refuse to balance them since they normally dont have the correct equipment, have problems getting the tire balanced, or problems getting the weights to stay on.
    Yes I believe so... I will know for sure when I get my winter set mounted.

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