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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by r.barn View Post
    Extra heat from turbos is a myth from people who have never had a turbo.
    This isn't exactly true. I have owned several turbo charged vehicles, but never a turbo truck. At lower boost levels, heat shouldn't be an issue, assuming that everything is working properly and the intercooler is doing its job. Once you start pushing air closer to the threshold of a turbo's capability then heat becomes an issue.

    I have always noticed in the past that motors I installed a turbo on had higher EGT readings after than before. I can't see why this would be any different on a V8/truck than on a V6/I4/car.

    Always keep in mind that there are many more things to take into consideration when going turbo than just the snail.
    Scott

    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

    '94 Chevy Suburban K1500
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  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by ct9a View Post
    This isn't exactly true. I have owned several turbo charged vehicles, but never a turbo truck. At lower boost levels, heat shouldn't be an issue, assuming that everything is working properly and the intercooler is doing its job. Once you start pushing air closer to the threshold of a turbo's capability then heat becomes an issue.

    I have always noticed in the past that motors I installed a turbo on had higher EGT readings after than before. I can't see why this would be any different on a V8/truck than on a V6/I4/car.

    Always keep in mind that there are many more things to take into consideration when going turbo than just the snail.

    Everything you just complained about has to do with boosting an engine. Not just a turbo.

    "pushing the threshold" on turbo means the compressor is getting inefficient. Same thing happens
    with s/c. Has everything to do with compressor inefficiency adding heat.

    Of course EGT's will be high. You are shoving more air and fuel in and making a bigger bang.
    Again same factors involved whether its a turbo or s/c.
    Whole reason you run super rich air/fuel ratio under boost is too help cool EGT's

    Turbo's do not add any more heat into the intake charge that an s/c.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by r.barn View Post
    Everything you just complained about has to do with boosting an engine. Not just a turbo.

    "pushing the threshold" on turbo means the compressor is getting inefficient. Same thing happens
    with s/c. Has everything to do with compressor inefficiency adding heat.

    Of course EGT's will be high. You are shoving more air and fuel in and making a bigger bang.
    Again same factors involved whether its a turbo or s/c.
    Whole reason you run super rich air/fuel ratio under boost is too help cool EGT's

    Turbo's do not add any more heat into the intake charge that an s/c.
    I'm not complaining about anything. I'm merely pointing out that your statement of "extra heat from a turbo is myth" is BS. How much heat a SC creates, I'm not sure, but I do know that a turbo will add heat and increase IAT's over N/A. Have you ever grabbed the hot side of an IC on a turbo car?
    Scott

    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

    '94 Chevy Suburban K1500
    3" exhaust w/ aero turbine non-baffled muffler
    CFM Technologies TB spacer
    CB w/ 44" whip antenna


  4. #14
    Sr. Mechanic poncho08's Avatar
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    I've been looking at the new supercharger from vortex for my truck and it's probably around $6000 not including the install time which they say is about 10 hours.

  5. #15
    Master Mechanic CarpenterGuy's Avatar
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    a super charger is good for low end rpm range. a turbo is good for high end rpm's like when you floor it.
    2006 Silverado Z71 - 97,000 - totaled, RIP
    2006 Silverado Z71 - 122,000 (K&N 77 Series CAI, PowerAid TBS, Magnaflow dual rear exit, 33x12.50 Mickey Thompson MTZ, Tuff Country Torsion Keys, Tuff Country Add-A-Leafs)
    1966 C10 swb stepside (Gen I 350, Turbo 400 trans, dual cyl power brakes, front discs)
    I'll keep my money, guns, and freedom. You keep the Change.

  6. #16
    Jr. Apprentice dangerous dave's Avatar
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    heres the deal with turbos, you can get stump pulling torque right off idle with a turbo. back in the old days turbos were so large that it took time for them to spool up thereby having a lag between mashed pedal and power coming on. now newer and smaller turbos spool up just off idle to 6-7000 rpm and continue to reach boost numbers in the 25-35lb range. look at big semis especially detroit engines. there are cars out there with bigger turbos on them. were talking about 12-15 liter engines 800+ cubic inches. these turbos are reaching max boost at 1300 rpm and sustaining it through 2100 rpm. they are using smaller turbos that spool up fast and have the capacity to raise the torque and hp ratings 2200 tqe and 600+hp. for a pulling truck you would want a smaller turbo that spools quick. a charge air cooler would be best suited but water to air could work. you will get higher exhaust temps as with a supercharger. also there is no parasitic loss oh hp as the turbo is exhaust driven and a supercharger is belt driven, you'll want to keep the boost pressure around 6-8 lbs and add a pyrometer to moniter exhaust temps. the extra heat can be handled by covering the exhaust side with header wrap. just watch your pyro and you should be a whole lot happier than dealing with a supercharger. look at the worlds fastest street cars..they are running turbos. some even bigger that the one i have on my truck. you will have to learn how to driva a turbo motor because they are not the same. with a turbo you will gain all through the rpm band. smaller turbo =fast boost, low end power, mid range good power, powere on the top end is limited but improved over natural aspiration. big turbo =spools slower low end minimal gains, excellant mid range and superior top end power. stay away from a supercharger. most power adders come from diesel engines. back in the day they had blowers, now they use turbos. there is a reason
    You know I'm born to lose, and gamblings for fools, but that's the way I like it baby I'm not gonna live forever

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