GM Truck Club
THE PREMIER CHEVY TRUCK & SUV FORUM
Founded in 2004 ~ We're the #1 Chevy Truck & SUV Forum.
Silverado & Sierra | Tahoe & Yukon | Suburban & Yukon XL | SUV & CROSSOVER
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 Last Post byLast Post by
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11
    Legend
    stephan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Far West, Oregon USA,
    Posts
    8,610
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I don't know why you would do this or what you will gain, but for reinforcement to keep the frame from folding up on you, as was mentioned above, I would put a 10/12 point roll cage in it & weld it to the FRAME, not to floor plates that are bolted to the floor pan.
    If you plan on 4 wheelin/hillclimbing it, this will give you some protection, & if you're going to make a boulevard cruiser out of it, the cage will give it some eye appeal.
    1988 Chevy C-3500 2wd (no pic)
    350 c.i. 5.7 L Stock Block, 4 Bolt Mains
    L-31 Vortec Heads, Edelbrock Cam & Intake,
    Holley 650, Flowtech Headers, Magnaflow exh.
    Jet Trans 700R4, B&M Ratchet, 4:10 gears,
    3" susp. lift kit "shadetree"
    No rev limiter, No speed limiter lol


  2. #12

    Default

    Thanks for replies from all. Stephan, are you an automotive engineer? I would like to find someone willing to provide engineering specifications for reinforcing frame and would pay them to do that. I thought "body on frame" (BOF) construction would alleviate somewhat the need to reinforce ... after all, isn't that a benefit of BOF construction v. unibody construction? And as to the question "why would I do this or what would I gain?" I thought that would be obvious ... what I want is a convertible suburban ... sort of like the early 70's K-5 Blazer or a jeep but with a lot more seating and room.

  3. #13

    Default

    I can't seem to find a pic as an example, but the frame from the factory can twist and flex easy. If you reinforce the frame and/or build the cage and tie it into the frame at key points, it prevents the frame from twisting.
    Christopher

    1991 Chevy Suburban 1/2 ton 2WD w/ chevy SBC 350-3/4 ton drivetrain upgrade w/4.10 gears 200K miles
    2005 Saturn ION-2 Stock 277K miles
    1982 Bronco, 1993 Bronco (sold), 1971 M35A2 Deuce and a Half



    There are 10 kinds of people, those who understand binary, and those who dont...

    Remember kids, the only difference between screwing around and science is writing it down- Adam Savage

  4. #14
    Legend
    stephan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Far West, Oregon USA,
    Posts
    8,610
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Lake Lanier Boater,
    No, I am not a structural engineer. I am just going by sucesses & failures that I have seen with these kinds of projects. You are correct, bof is better for this than unibody would be, but there is a lot of structural integrity that is designed into the roof that actually works to help support the frame & box the whole package. By cutting the A,B, & C pillars & the roof off, you are taking this strength away, & a cage will help to put it back.
    I'm not saying you can't do it, or shouldn't do it, I'm just saying your project will be more successful if you cage it now when it's still straight, rather than later after the frame is fatigued, bent, & twisted.
    If you stayed off rough roads, took it easy on high intersections, railroad tracks, driveway aprons, and freeway bridge approaches, you may not suffer frame fatigue, but this is difficult to do in real world driving. If your frame starts twisting or folding the first place you will notice it is in the tops of the doors binding and scrapeing. At that point it will be more difficult to cage it because you will have to straighten the frame out first. It's just a lot easier to address this issue now before that happens.

    Anybody having trouble posting today? I've tried this twice & it keeps dissappearing.

  5. #15

    Default

    Here's an 80s bodystyle suburban that looks like it was chopped and boatsided, something to get your mind to cranking.... And the cage is important for frame strength


  6. #16
    Jr. Apprentice
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Hillsboro, Oregon
    Posts
    19

    Default

    As far as frame twist goes...I thought burbs had truck frames? Trucks are split and the beds flex like crazy. They don't have cages, they flex when wheeled. They seldom break. What makes the burb frame any different? The one we put the blazer top on never got anything to reinforce it. It has been wheeled nearly every weekend and took a run at mudfest and it is still going strong. A cage is a good idea anyway due to roll over protection and aesthetics, but I don't think it's a must have. Worst case is if you have it in a twist, you may not be able to open the doors. I had that in my old Z71. (it had a roof). Not trying to argue, but saying you have to have a structural cage is misinformation.
    Still can't find that damn blinker fluid reservoir.....

  7. #17
    Legend
    stephan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Far West, Oregon USA,
    Posts
    8,610
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by silverlion View Post
    Not trying to argue, but saying you have to have a structural cage is misinformation.
    Lol, I'm not trying to argue it either, but the pic that Crawdaddy posted kind of makes the point. That truck still has the A, B, & C pillars, half of the roof, & they still thought it necessary to build a cage in it.

    Also, weren't the K-5 Blazers shorter wheelbase than the burbans?

    Pickups vs. Burbans: Pickups still have cabs & half a box structure for the bed that imparts some structural stability to the frame, whereas the poster is going to cut the top off his Burban & make a convertable. All he is going to have is the frame & the floor pan for strength. The doors will do nothing to support frame rigidity. They will only be supporting their own weight.

  8. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by silverlion View Post
    As far as frame twist goes...I thought burbs had truck frames? Trucks are split and the beds flex like crazy. They don't have cages, they flex when wheeled. They seldom break. What makes the burb frame any different? The one we put the blazer top on never got anything to reinforce it. It has been wheeled nearly every weekend and took a run at mudfest and it is still going strong. A cage is a good idea anyway due to roll over protection and aesthetics, but I don't think it's a must have. Worst case is if you have it in a twist, you may not be able to open the doors. I had that in my old Z71. (it had a roof). Not trying to argue, but saying you have to have a structural cage is misinformation.
    Agreed...Most convertables or car nowadays are weak unibodies and need support from the roof.But you have a real frame and it won't buckle...heck you could run with no body at all and be fine.On another note if you roll it you would definately need a roll cage.


    03 Chevy Silverado 1500 ext cab Z-71
    79 AMC Spirit GT
    77 Olds cutlass supreme

  9. #19

    Default

    I agree that I would want a roll cage for aesthetics and safety anyway. If anyone knows an engineer that I could pay for specs on doing this would be glad to hire him. Thanks again and when I get this done I will post a photo.

  10. #20
    Legend
    stephan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Far West, Oregon USA,
    Posts
    8,610
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Z-71 View Post
    Agreed...Most convertables or car nowadays are weak unibodies and need support from the roof.
    What? How does a convertable roof give support to "anything" ?

Similar Threads

  1. Cutting the Catalytic Converter
    By 1500ExtChevy in forum Chevy Silverado Forum (GMC Sierra)
    Replies: 10
    Last: 04-16-2010, 09:06 AM
  2. Cutting the cats off of my truck?
    By ras in forum GM Powertrain
    Replies: 20
    Last: 01-10-2010, 02:39 PM
  3. Cutting Off Cats
    By ippielb in forum Performance & Fuel
    Replies: 32
    Last: 01-02-2010, 11:47 AM
  4. Air Conditioning Cutting off
    By i_build in forum Chevy Suburban Forum (GMC Yukon XL)
    Replies: 4
    Last: 07-03-2009, 03:11 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •