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Thread: browns gas

  1. #1

    Default browns gas

    hey guys im looking into this browns gas for my truck i have 2 trucks to try it out on one is a 94 gmc with a 350 tbi and the other is a 83 gmc with a carburated 350. my first question is how do i make the browns gas i know i have to put electircity through water but im not sure how to do that. my next question is if i put it on my tbi will i have to have the computer flashed with a new program or will it compensate on its own. on my 83 im wondering if i have to turn the fuel down or what the deal is on the carb. any advice is helpful thanks guys

  2. #2
    Legend

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    Default

    WHAT the heck is Brown's gas?
    If you put electricity thru (Hydrolysis) water you can produce H2 and O2, but that is pointless since you will use more energy doing that than you will get when you reburn the H2.

    I've heard claims that adding a little H2 to gasoline will "make it burn better"-this is BS. If you are talking about one of those hydrogen generators then save your money-they are just another scam-like Turbonators and the "100 mpg carburetors that the oil companies suppressed that all the cheapo magazines advertised in the 50's and 60's)

    Save your money.
    My guess is so little H2 is produced that you would have no problem with a carbed vehicle and probably no problem with a more modern EFI vehicle. There just isn't much H2 produced by these hydrogen generators.

    If you are talking about something else-my apologies. I have been interested in mpg for 40 years-many many scams have come and gone-they never stay dead.If it suggests more power then the limiting factor is always the O2 you can get in a cylinder- not the liquid fuel which is easy to get in in abundance and over abundance. N20 works because it breaks down to O2- nitromethane works because it carries its own oxygen-like gunpowder or an explosive.
    Charlie
    1998 suburban-
    1/2 ton

    199500 miles
    River
    Ridge,LA

  3. #3

    Default

    X2 what phoebeisis asked. What is brown gas??????

  4. #4
    Legend

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    Default

    I just looked it up. It is what I thought it was.
    When you break water-H20- apart using electricity you get a mixture of H2 and O2- it is called Brown's gas.

    The hydrogen generators that do this are being sold as bolt on gimmicks to "improve gas mpg".

    They are RIP OFFS.

    If they actually worked GMs OEM engineers would have them on every motor that came out of the factory.

    They are just one more rip off mpg gimmick.

    Sorry to be so negative, but MPG ripoff gadgets have a long history.

    They work best taking money out of your pocket and putting it into the sellers pocket.

    I have been interested in mpg for 40 years- it is a hobby of mine I guess. GM small blocks are capable of EXCELLENT MPG as they come from the factory.GM has been developing them for over 50 years. They know how to extract mpg from those motors. With their 2 valve heads pushrods they beat 4 valve OHC "more modern" motors in respect to mpg and in respect to packaging them in an engine bay.

    I was stunned when my first full sized GM( a used 1998 Suburban with over 195,000 miles) got 21 MPG on a 3000 mile hy trip. I expected 17 mpg, but got 21 mpg-just 2-3 mpg less I got with my (relatively tiny)Honda Pilot-800 lbs lighter with 3.5 lt V-6- on the same trip same hy same everything.

    There isn't anything you can bolt on one of these SBC that the OEM engineers haven't already tried and discarded.
    Now you can get better mpg
    1)Driving style/speed
    2)Lose weight
    3)Lighter wheels lower RR tires
    4)Syn fluids- oil and diff lube
    5) Change gearing-rear end- expensive of course, and won't give much improvement(a couple of .1 mpg)
    6) Aerodynamic improvements- some folks turn their vehicles into 50 cal bullets with pointy nosed and boat tails-works, but not for everyone.
    Once again-I don't mean to be a know it all or harsh-but save your $$.You can't beat the OEM engineers for engine efficiency-they are just too good-know all the angles-they fight for .05 mpg improvements.
    Luck
    Charlie
    1998 suburban-
    1/2 ton

    199500 miles
    River
    Ridge,LA

  5. #5

    Default

    Some of that stuff is just scary.

  6. #6

    Default

    You know when I posted this I didn't ask for someones negative thoughts about it I asked if anyone has tried it and what there experience was with it. I know you didn't try it if you have to ask what browns gas is. As much as I love gm and will always love gm I know better than to believe that they are getting every last drop of fuel out of a mile especially in a truck.

  7. #7

    Default

    But what is brown gas?

    ---------- Post added at 08:35 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:51 AM ----------

    Is it gas thats sold in CA. only.

  8. #8
    Legend

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    Default

    It is the mixture of oxygen gas and hydrogen gas you get when you break water down using electricity.
    It is very flammable.
    The usual claim is that it improves combustion so much that it improves fuel economy.
    The gadgets sold to do this are frequently called hydrogen generators.

    cwbontheyfz- true I've never tried it. But this is a public forum and you can't really control what folks say-within reason. If you do a search in one of the mpg forums- like ecomodders or cleanmpg you will find lots of motor heads who have lots to say on various modifications. Some modifications work-some plausible modifications don't work as well as you might think.Some are pure BS scams-to take money out of your pocket. Some dress up some science-Chemistry- to sound plausible, but they just don't work.
    Try a hydrogen generator and report your result to us.
    Yes,I have a pretty high opinion of most OEM engineers-all brands really- in respect to FE. They literally fight for .01 mpg-especially in trucks where getting 1 mpg is a huge improvement.
    These folks know their business. The current SBC's(especially the 5.3) and the ones from a generation ago(5.7) are capable of exceptional FE.My 5.7 98 Suburban gets 21 mpg by just putting it in CC at about 62 mph(actually set it to 68, but with road work and slowing down in cities I'm averaging more like 62 mph). Current 5.3 2wd 1/2 tons of all sorts with cylinder shutdown can get about 24 mpg at 62 mph on the hy.The XFE probably 25 mpg.
    Luck
    Charlie
    1998 suburban-
    1/2 ton

    199500 miles
    River
    Ridge,LA

  9. #9

    Default

    Thanks for the explanation Phoebeisis. Now that I know what it is I know two guys around here that made homemade units and one did explode.

  10. #10
    Legend

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    Default

    Silveradotrailblazer- YIKES- yes if you use electrolysis to break water down you will end up with a very flammable mixture-think the Hindenberg zepplin but even worse since with these gadgets the O2 and H2 will be pretty close together.You could get a bomb like effect and it would blow out your fuel line-BOOM!

    To the OP I don't mean to sound like such a freakin' know it all, but in respect to mpg I have spent waaay too much time thinking and plotting about how to get better mpg. I've come to the conclusion that GMs engineers are much much better at it that I or any aftermarket guy are.

    I wasn't originally a fan of GM.Up until about 6 years ago I never owned a GM-even then it was just a Prism-rebadged Corolla. It was a good car- boring but very functional.
    We have had serious $$ problems since 2006 (wife got sick-chronically ill-disabled-insurance was worthless-usual story-she is doing ok now)- so we were forced to sell a 2003 Pilot(for $15,500) and bought a 195,500 mile 1998 Suburban 2wd to replace it. We needed a big vehicle to evacuate 2 dogs 4 cats 3 adults in case of another hurricane(suburb of NOLA). I expected a piece of junk gas guzzler that would hold together to get us 100 miles N of NOLA and would be an OK second vehicle.
    Big surprise it seemed so reliable we took it on a 3000 mile trip the first summer. Bigger surprise it got 21 mpg (about 141 gallons 3015 miles).I was against taking it but my wife said she wouldn't travel in our tiny Prius(good car-great mpg- but my wife is disabled and being squashed into a 175" car for 36 hours would be tough. We wife, me, and the dog-Phoebe- sleep enroute at rest stops.Just park leave motor and AC on for 6 hours). Well long story still long it has been a reliable vehicle with great mpg considering its size/utility. Sure I have had to replace about $900 worth of parts in 18,000 miles- but $900 worth of maintenance in 20,000 miles isn't much(radiator, brake booster, belt tensioner,water pump, shocks, intake gaskets- usual stuff).

    GMs engineers have done a great job on getting fuel efficiency from their small block drivetrains. You literally can't beat them with intake/exhaust mods.
    1)Yes you can get lower Rolling resistance tires(you give up some grip, maybe braking and some muddy road utility of course).
    2)You can slow down-never easy.
    3)You can get lighter wheels-forged alloy wheels are 5 lbs less than cast OEM wheels-this helps a TINY bit on city mpg.
    4)Change rear end-taller grearing helps but is expensive and helps less then you would think.
    5)You can pull your 3 rd row seat if you rarely use it(about 80 lbs).
    6)You can pull one of the second row to get more flat sleeping storage space-but you give up people carrying capacity.
    7)You can pulse and glide in city driving-this improves city mpg by about 15%-20%-roughly like dropping to a midsized SUV but having the utility of a full sized SUV-this is what folks should have done during the 2008 fuel spike instead of selling their Suburbans for peanuts)
    8) Keep your tire pressure at at least door jam numbers-some run max on side wall numbers-I run about 42 psi ft and rear on trips-less in the city.Not much to be gained from running much over doorjam pressures-ride is stiffer more jarring with just a tiny mpg increase..

    Yes, I spend waaaay too much time thinking about mpg. 2010 GM full sized trucks(2wd- drop 1 mpg for 4x4)-not hybrids- can now get 24 mpg hy and an honest 18 mpg city if you change your driving a little.The XFE can get 25 mpg hy and about the same 18 mpg city. These aren't EPA numbers-these are what you get with modest hypermiling techniques. By modest I don't mean motor off gliding or any extreme stuff like that. GMs somehow have the transmission set up so if you lift off the gas at 40 mph they auto trans just "disconnects/depressurizes" and acts like it is in N not D-ZERO ENGINE BRAKING at normal city speeds.

    Like I said-GM engineers are very smart.You can't beat their motor/transmission setup for part throttle fuel economy with any add on gimmicks.In the old carbureted days- you could-now no way.Those 2 valve pushrod motors are nice and compact and have low internal friction if you keep the RPMS reasonable-. I was really surprised that they get as good or better FE as the more complicated 4 valve OHC chambers.

    Well I have run on.
    Charlie
    1998 suburban-
    1/2 ton

    199500 miles
    River
    Ridge,LA

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