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View Poll Results: Air or Nitorgen

Voters
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  • Air

    37 69.81%
  • Nitrogen

    16 30.19%
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Results 41 to 49 of 49
  1. #41

    Default

    I use air because air is everywhere, nitrogen isn't around enough to randomly get it. On the flip side, a customer bought rims/tires and they were filled with nitrogen, they haven't lost a single psi in 8 months.

  2. #42
    Jr. Engineer Jamm3r's Avatar
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    Not much difference between nitrogen and dry air.

    Some folks say that the oxygen in the air binds with the metal in the rim or the rubber in the tire leading to a loss of pressure. I'm not so sure that goes on, and to the extent that it does, it is used up leaving... mostly nitrogen.

    You all do check your tire pressures at least once a month, right?
    Minneapolis area - 1997 K2500 regular cab long bed + 8.5' Western Unimount plow + modified transmission + 2nd battery + modified camper charge circuit + 1971 Cayo camper -and- 2004 4x4 Suburban 2500 8.1 + Maxbrake controller + 2nd battery + modified trailer charge circuit + Reese receiver, pulls 30' Airstream trailer

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamm3r View Post
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    You all do check your tire pressures at least once a month, right?
    Actually, at every fill up! I scroll through all of the options in my DIC to reset my average mpg and my trip, I pass the tire pressures on the way so I check them out also.

    1995 Silverado 4x4
    6" BDS Suspension Lift-3" Body Lift-Add A Leaf in rear -Trailmaster SSV Shocks-Duel Steering Stabilizer Kit -AirAid Cold air intake-
    4.56 Gears with Detroit Auburn Locker-Pro-Comp Traction Bars with duel shocks-Aluminum Skid Plate Kit-38.5" x 16.5" Mickey Thompson Baja Claws-Constant Dropping fuel gauge

    2005 Yukon XL Jet Power Programmer, Bilstein Shocks, Bilstein rear springs, Helwig Anti-sway bars, EGR Window Visors, EGR Hood Shield, Denali Headlights, Headlight harness upgrade, GE NightHawk Bulbs, White Night Rear lighting system, Russell Braided SS brake lines, PowerStop Brake pads, PowerStop cross drilled and Slotted Rotors, http://www.gmtruckclub.com/forum/sho...5-GMC-Yukon-XL
    2002 Silverado ext cab 2wd (Sold)
    2003 Yukon XL (Totaled)

  4. #44

    Default

    ...and having a tire pressure monitoring system is another reason to use the less corrosive nitrogen. ;)
    Buy Made in USA, The job you save just might be your own.

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by E_HILLMAN View Post
    .. another reason to use the less corrosive nitrogen.
    Ok, you'll have to explain that to me. Other than a few pollutants, what is corrosive about the air you breath.
    Ray

    '09 Avalanche LTZ - Black
    '05 Envoy XL (sold)

  6. #46

    Default

    Oxygen by nature causes oxidation, without it you wouldn't really have rust etc. With the nitrogen (if you are getting a good more pure fill of it) you have MUCH less Oxygen thus you have less of a reaction. The tire monitoring system is sensitive and thus any corrosion you can keep down from them will make them last longer.

    Or if you want a more intelligent reply than I can give. (LOL)
    http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_is_the...ygen_corrosive
    Answer:



    Oxidizing compounds

    Oxygen gas (O2) is a pretty good oxidant (in fact, the word "oxidize" comes from "oxygen"). This is because oxygen is fairly electronegative. When bonded to itself, it forms a purely covalent bond. In contrast, when bonded to many other elements, in particular to less electronegative metals, oxygen is able to have more electron density for itself. So oxygen gas will react with other elements, such as iron, and then rust or corrode them. Other very corrosive elements are F2, Cl2, and Br2, all for the same reasons -- they are very electronegative, and by combining with something other than themselves, they are able to gain more electrons.
    Also note that burning is the same process as rusting, although we don't think of it that way! Both are just something combining with oxygen. Compare the two reactions:
    Rusting of iron: 4Fe + 3O2 --> 2Fe2O3
    Burning of methane: CH4 + 2O2 --> CO2 + 2H2O In fact, burning is just oxygen combining with the fuel (whether it be wood, oil, gas, coal, or anything else) to form products in which the reactants are oxidized. So oxygen is in fact quite reactive with many things. Usually to get things to burn, you need a spark to get the reaction burning though (there is an activation barrier to the reaction, but it is an very exothermic reaction). Rusting is also quite exothermic, but it is kinetically slow.
    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ox...on-d_1170.html

    - - - Updated - - -

    Using good Nitrogen instead of "air" can also keep cheaper aluminum wheels from oxidizing and causing tire leaks as many have had issues with.
    Buy Made in USA, The job you save just might be your own.

  7. #47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by E_HILLMAN View Post
    Oxygen by nature causes oxidation, without it you wouldn't really have rust etc. With the nitrogen (if you are getting a good more pure fill of it) you have MUCH less Oxygen thus you have less of a reaction. The tire monitoring system is sensitive and thus any corrosion you can keep down from them will make them last longer.

    Or if you want a more intelligent reply than I can give. (LOL)
    http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_is_the...ygen_corrosive


    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ox...on-d_1170.html

    - - - Updated - - -

    Using good Nitrogen instead of "air" can also keep cheaper aluminum wheels from oxidizing and causing tire leaks as many have had issues with.
    While in theory I agree with the answer, the problem is when servicing tires their never properly prepared for a Nitrogen charge so technically all your really doing is slightly slowing down the corrosive affects.
    To properly create a non-corrosive environment inside the tire you would need to do a hot purge of dry Nitrogen at 120deg until the tire and rim reached a temperature of 120deg and for not less than 40 minutes to ensure the total space inside the tire was properly purged (given calculations of the average tire size and cubic space inside) anything less than this would not guarantee a total Nitrogen environment, it would be diluted and thus susceptible to corrosion. Which is why the American Gas Standard doesnt endorse servicing tires with Nitrogen since you cant achieve a complete and undiluted Nitrogen fill.

    To properly fill and service a tire with Nitrogen would require two valve stems so you had an outlet for the hot purge gases.

  8. #48

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by E_HILLMAN View Post
    Oxygen by nature causes oxidation, without it you wouldn't really have rust etc. .
    I agree, oxygen is an oxidizer, but not necessarily corrosive (oxidization is not always a bad thing). It requires a moist environment to reactive with iron to form rust. If by it's very nature, it rusted sheet steel, vehicles from the "dry" states would be rusty.

    Quote Originally Posted by E_HILLMAN View Post
    With the nitrogen (if you are getting a good more pure fill of it) you have MUCH less Oxygen thus you have less of a reaction.
    Air is (if I remember correctly) 78% nitrogen and 16% oxygen, unless you purge the air (as @tbplus 10 suggested) out of the tire before you fill with nitrogen, you will still have some oxygen.
    Ray

    '09 Avalanche LTZ - Black
    '05 Envoy XL (sold)

  9. #49

    Default

    Indeed but every bit that helps slow it down is good with me.

    Oxidation does not need much if any moisture to happen. Rust might but even your plastic parts can get oxidation.
    Buy Made in USA, The job you save just might be your own.

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