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1998 Suburban brakes- shoes not wearing

Discussion in 'Chevy Suburban Forum (GMC Yukon XL)' started by EdPDX, Jul 13, 2011.

  1. EdPDX

    EdPDX Rockstar

    After searching all of the forums and having read about the TSB 99-05-24-001, which covers the need to replace proportioning valves and rear brakes on certain model, I felt I had found my answer...

    My K1500 4x4 suburban SLT is chewing up brakes like candy- just the fron ones, and more of the inboard pad than the outboards. The rear shoes don't seem to contribute to a STOP, as the nose seems to be pulling downward. I assumed that the fix was to replace the Prop. Valve and switch to the shoes mentioned in the TSB. It specifically says: "Replace the rear brake shoes with P/N 18029651. This does not apply to the 13x2 1/2" brake shoe, the Dura Stop P/N 18029650 brake shoe or any other size brake." Since the vehicle only came with 11-5/32 x 2-3/4" or 13x2 1/2" brake shoes, I stupidly assumed that the fix indeed applied to me as I do not have 13x2 1/2" brake shoes; but the smaller 11's. The new shoes I ordered are 13's!... like I said "stupidly assumed". So now I have a new proportioning valve and I need to put the shoes back in as the new ones dont fit the spindle plate or drums.
    1. What type of shoes (11's) can I go to for the best stopping power?
    2. In bleeding the brakes- new wheel cylinder needed, I plan on pressure bleeding- does the dirt road ABS activation prior to bleeding trick work?
  2. 2COR517

    2COR517 Epic Member 5+ Years 1000 Posts

    The rears don't do much of the stopping on these trucks. Could simply be the shoes are not adjusted properly. They should be almost dragging when idle. Use the parking brake cable to keep the shoes centered as you adjust them up.

    Most any shoe will work fine. You rarely see more than one grade at the auto store anyway. As for the inner pads wearing faster, not unusual. The calipers need to slide nice and easy on the bolts/pins. How many miles are you getting out of the front pads? What kind of driving? What brand/grade are you using?
  3. EdPDX

    EdPDX Rockstar

    These pads are wearing at the rate of 2-3 times a YEAR! I have tried expensive ceramics -raybestos I think; but went to Duralast Gold because if I have to keep changing them, I might as well get them for free.

    What is the correct way of adjusting the shoes?

    what does this mean?
  4. MrShorty

    MrShorty Epic Member Staff Member 5+ Years 1000 Posts

    They should self adjust, so, when I've done mine, I put the drums on and apply the brakes several times while in the air to get the shoes to extend out, then several applications around the block until they feel like they've tightened up all they will.

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