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89 Burb, Engine rebuild or crate motor????

Discussion in 'Chevy Truck Talk & GM News' started by Ape, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. Ape

    Ape Member 2 Years 100 Posts

    I remember it being called Shade Tree back then. But I can't say as I remember it changing to Crank and Chrome?

    As for Stacey, I really like him! He's a guys guy even though he has a girls name. lol
    What kind of work do you do for him?
  2. moogvo

    moogvo Epic Member 5+ Years 1000 Posts

    I say "NOWWW... You're watchin' GEARZ!!! Brought to you by Ram Trucks." at the top of the show... Among other phrases and some commercials - Bully dog, Airaid, and American Powertrain.

    http://Www.thomasmoog.com
  3. Ape

    Ape Member 2 Years 100 Posts

    NICE! The "voice" of the show huh? I've been told many times in life that I should've gone that route with my voice. But I always took it to mean I had a big mouth! lol I think that's why the teachers liked to pick me to read outloud in class all the time too. That, or they just wanted to keep me invloved in the class instead of being the class clown? ;-)
  4. moogvo

    moogvo Epic Member 5+ Years 1000 Posts

    I have been at it for over 20 years. I started as a radio DJ and did that for years before leaving and being self employed. It is not an easy business to make a living at. It takes time to build a client list you can live off of.
  5. Ape

    Ape Member 2 Years 100 Posts

    I can imagine it's a tough business. I used to have a pretty good friend who was about 20 years older than me that was in the same business.
    When we were out at the air field for our RC planes he would tell me all kids of horror stories. Towards the end of his career he had a real tough time getting jobs to keep things going.
  6. Ape

    Ape Member 2 Years 100 Posts

    Well I decided on the crate engine from my local Chevy Dealer (John Elway Chevrolet fromerly known as Burt Chevy). It's a direct replacement engine for my truck in long block form. It comes with everything but the intake manifold, TBI, various sensors, distributor and various pulleys. The cost is just over 2,000 and comes with a 3 year 100,000 mile warranty. Plus that warranty can be serviced at any Chevy dealership in the states and I don't have to pull the engine to have the warranty work done.

    After a long and tiring day today, my best friend, wife, my nephew and I managed to get the old engine pulled and start taking a few of the old parts off that I plan on putting back onto the new engine. The only parts I'll be reusing will be the sensors, the intake manifold and TBI. The sensors are basically new and the TBI was recently rebuilt. Other than that I have a new distributor, cap and rotor, plug wires and plugs, water pump, radiator hoses, motor mounts and thermostat. So it'll be basically a new engine once I'm through.

    Tomorrow should be another long day since my goal is to atleast have all the new parts mounted and get the engine dropped in and bolted up. With any luck I'll have it running Monday sometime, but I'm not gonna hold my breath since I know things never go as smoothly as you'd like when doing things like this. But I can still hope! ;-)
  7. Ape

    Ape Member 2 Years 100 Posts

    So my best friend and I spent all last week cleaning old parts and the engine bay (somewhat) and bolting all the needed parts onto the new engine in preperation for the drop in today (Saturday). I was really hoping to have it all dropped in and running today, but we had a heck of a time getting the bell housing and engine lined up. And then the motor mounts gave us some fits as well. So most of the day was spent on those things along with the other braces and bolts needed to make it solid.
    Before we called it a day, we got most everything done though. Tomorrow is all about finishing up some electrical connections, fuel and TBI connections along with the radiator hoses and fan. Then it's fingers and toes crossed for a clean start and break in.

    Here it is as it sits now......
    [​IMG]


    By the way.....Did I mention that my brand new crate engine from GM with it's 3 year 100,000 mile warranty is made in Mexico?!?!?!?!? WTH?!?!?!?
  8. Ape

    Ape Member 2 Years 100 Posts

    Well we didn't manage to get it running on Saturday. The connection to the transmission took a bit more time than expected. The only cars I've ever dropped engines into have been older muscle car types. So the bell housing pins and bolts are still a pain on those, but there's a lot less crap in the way to get those connections made. Not so with a 1989 Suburban! After that we got held back for a while with the motor mount bolt down process. This too seems to be a bit more difficult than an old muscle car.
    So all in all Saturday we got the engine in and bolted down along with a few electrical connections and brackets being mounted.

    We started this morning (Sunday) at 8 A.M. (again) and started hitting little snags and roadblocks almost immediately. Hanging the rest of the brackets, pulleys and altenator was simple enough. As were the connections for things such as the power steering and AC unit. The headaches came when we started connecting all the electrical and vacuum lines. We found that some of the connections we thought we had well documented in pictures were no longer documented.
    That was my fault (somehow). I downloaded all of my pics to Photobucket (I thought!), but apparantly a bunch of key pictures never made it there.
    So needless to say, it took us a while to find all the correct connections and correct routing of the wires.

    The last thing to delay us from starting the new engine was the distributor position. Once again we apparantly dropped the new one in a bit off from where it needed to be. And we couldn't turn it far enough to make up for our mistake because of the coil position. And pulling the distributor to drop it back in at the correct position was the last option we wanted to take. The room you have to pull the distributor once the engine is in is limited to say the least. Luckily we were able to move all of the wires on the cap 2 positions clockwise and make up for our ineptitude. lol

    So without further adieu, here's the video of it running for the first time with the new Mexican engine!


    [​IMG]

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