Any Canadians have legal experience in vehicle tax?

Discussion in 'The Coffee Shop ~ Chit Chat' started by finalday7, Jan 10, 2008.

  1. finalday7

    finalday7 Epic Member 5+ Years ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    Hey guys. I'll be heading home sometime this year and something that's really bothering me is having to pay tax on my truck again. I'm not looking forward to shelling out 2500 bucks to title my truck in canada after I just payed that here. Does anyone know a way around this or a way to cut the cost down. If you or someone you know could help PLEASE let me know and there will be a nice cut in it for you and/or your friend considering my truck and my parents 06 Titan will be heading up. Thanks for any help.
     
  2. TahoeFever

    TahoeFever Epic Member 5+ Years 500 Posts

    dude why are you paying Tax on your truck to revenue canada?

    did you buy the truck there or here ?

    I never once had to pay taxes on my hoe when i went home since i kept the plates of NJ on

    only time you would pay taxes is when you bring over your truck and swap plates back to canadian plates.. if you are planning to return home perm . then yah you might get slammed with a tax but if you are only visiting you have up to 6 months before you have to return to the US .
     
  3. finalday7

    finalday7 Epic Member 5+ Years ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    Yeah I'll be comin home permanently. Man This sux
     
  4. Holy Smoke

    Holy Smoke Rockstar 100 Posts

    They don't see the truck, probably, and you tell them what it's value is. Price of moving and having a young truck. I'm leaving my engine crank handle on.
     
  5. TahoeFever

    TahoeFever Epic Member 5+ Years 500 Posts

    what province?

    when you bought the truck you had a cdn title correct?

    and you surrendered the cdn tag for a new US title and tag correct?

    cause i know for a fact that the DMV in the US does not talk to the motor vehicles in canada . what i'm saying is that the DMV in canada might still have you down as your old canada address and you might just have to pay the fee to get the title . cause you already paid the tax once in canada when you bought the truck i assume so they are not going to charge you another import tax on a truck that you already own.

    you actually have bigger issues than that i do assume that since you are working here in the US and decide to move back you do know that revenue canada is gonna be knocking on your door for taxes ...lookup under revenue canada for moving back to canada . I ran into this a year ago or so when i wanted to move back . I've been in the US for 15 years now.

    good luck!
     
  6. finalday7

    finalday7 Epic Member 5+ Years ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    I bought the truck in New Orleans in October so canada hasn't gotten their cut yet. I paid the taxes to the U.S but I don't want to pay them again to canada. How do they asses the value of the truck? Does anyone know?
     
  7. TahoeFever

    TahoeFever Epic Member 5+ Years 500 Posts

    i'm making a call to a buddy of mine who works for revenue canada
     
  8. finalday7

    finalday7 Epic Member 5+ Years ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    Thanks alot
     
  9. TahoeFever

    TahoeFever Epic Member 5+ Years 500 Posts

    Items you can import duty- and tax-free

    Personal and household effects

    Personal and household effects include:
    • clothing and linen
    • furniture
    • furnishings
    • appliances
    • silverware
    • jewellery
    • antiques
    • family heirlooms
    • private collections of coins, stamps, or art
    • personal computers
    • books
    • musical instruments
    • hobby tools and other hobby items
    • personal vehicles
    • pleasure boats and the trailers to carry them (trailers are subject to Transport Canada requirements)
    • mobile trailers, not exceeding 2.6 metres (9 feet) in width, which the owner is capable of moving on a personal basis
    • utility trailers
    • motor homes
    • private aircrafts
    • tool sheds or garages (not attached to or that form part of a dwelling)
    A house, a large trailer you use as a residence, and any goods you use or will use commercially are not eligible as personal or household effects. These goods are subject to regular duties.
    Vehicles

    Personal effects can include any kind of pleasure vehicle, such as passenger cars, pickup trucks, camper trucks, vans, jeeps, chassis cabs, motorcycles, snowmobiles and motor homes, as long as you use the vehicles for non-commercial purposes. However, you should be aware of Transport Canada restrictions on vehicles.
    Transport Canada defines a vehicle as any vehicle that is capable of being driven or drawn on roads, by any means other than muscular power exclusively, but not including a vehicle designed to run exclusively on rails. Trailers such as recreational, boat, camping, horse, and stock trailers are considered vehicles, as are wood chippers, generators or any other equipment mounted on rims and tires.
    Transport Canada requirements

    Transport Canada's requirements apply to vehicles that are less than 15 years old, and to buses manufactured on or after January 1, 1971.
    Vehicles manufactured to meet United States safety standards do not comply with Canadian standards. As the importer, before you import your vehicle, you must contact Transport Canada's Registrar of Imported Vehicles (RIV) to ensure that it is admissible for importation and can be modified to meet the Canadian standards, after you import it.
    The RIV is an agency contracted by Transport Canada to administer a national program to ensure that imported vehicles are brought into compliance with Canada's safety standards.
    If you are considering importing a vehicle originally manufactured to meet United States safety and emission standards, contact the RIV at:
    Registrar of Imported Vehicles
    405 The West Mall, Suite 400
    Toronto ON
    M9C 5K7
    Telephone: 1-888-848-8240 (toll-free in Canada and the United States)
    416-626-6812 (from all other countries)
    Facsimile: 1-888-346-8235
    Web site: www.riv.ca
    If your vehicle does not meet Canadian safety standards but qualifies for importation, a border services officer will register your vehicle into the RIV program at the port of entry on your arrival in Canada. The program registration fee is CAN$182 in all provinces except Quebec, where it is CAN$197. You will then have 45 days to bring your vehicle into compliance with Canadian safety standards and have it inspected.
    You cannot license your vehicle in Canada until it is modified and passes federal inspection under the RIV program.
    Vehicles originally manufactured to meet the safety standards of countries other than the United States or Canada are not allowed into Canada, unless they are 15 years or older, are buses manufactured before January 1, 1971, or are entering Canada temporarily. Before importing this type of vehicle, you must contact Transport Canada at:
    Telephone: 1-800-333-0371 (toll-free in Canada and the United States)
    613-998-8616 (from all other countries)
    Facsimile: 613-998-4831
    Web site: www.tc.gc.ca/roadsafety
    Other considerations

    Your vehicle will also be subject to provincial or territorial sales tax and safety requirements. Check with the motor vehicle department of the province or territory to which you are returning to resume residence.
    Before you export your vehicle to Canada, inquire with the customs authority of the country from which you will be exporting it if there are any requirements you must meet, before you can ship the vehicle out of the country.




    Importing a Vehicle Into Canada

    Introduction

    If you plan to import a vehicle into Canada, you should be aware that it has to comply with all Canadian import laws. The vehicle must meet the requirements of the CBSA, Transport Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency before it can be imported.
    Note: Transport Canada defines a vehicle as any vehicle that is capable of being driven or drawn on roads, by any means other than muscular power exclusively, but does not run exclusively on rails. Trailers, such as recreational, camping, boat, horse and stock trailers, are considered vehicles, as are wood chippers, generators or any other equipment mounted on rims and tires.

    Importing vehicles acquired in the United States

    Not all vehicles that are manufactured for sale in the United States can be imported into Canada. As a general rule, if the vehicle you plan to import was manufactured for sale in the United States and is less than 15 years old, or is a bus manufactured on or after January 1, 1971, you need to find out if it qualifies for importation under Transport Canada's Registrar of Imported Vehicles (RIV) program. The RIV program ensures that qualifying vehicles imported into Canada are modified, inspected and certified to meet Canadian safety standards. You can contact the RIV at the telephone number or address found in the section called "More information."
    If your vehicle qualifies for importation, you must register it in the RIV program when you report to the CBSA office on arrival in Canada. The RIV program registration fee is CAN$206.70 in all provinces except Quebec where it is CAN$222.21. You will also have to pay any customs and other import assessments that may apply. You then have 45 days to have the necessary changes made to your vehicle and have it inspected. You are responsible for all costs incurred to modify your vehicle in order for it to meet Transport Canada requirements.
    You cannot license your vehicle in Canada until the vehicle is modified and passes the federal inspection from the RIV. Before importing your vehicle, call the RIV at the number listed in the section called "More information" to ensure that it qualifies under the RIV program.
    Note:
    • If you are importing a vehicle for resale or for other commercial purposes, Transport Canada requires you to report to a CBSA office designated for that purpose when you arrive in Canada. For further details, call the RIV at the number listed in the section called "More information."
    • The original certificate of title for your vehicle must be submitted to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at least 72 hours before the vehicle is exported from the United States, and the vehicle must be presented to CBP at the time of exportation.
    RIV program exemptions

    You cannot import a vehicle that was manufactured to meet the safety standards of a country other than the United States or Canada unless the vehicle is the following:
    • The vehicle is fifteen years old or older (excludes buses). You determine the age of a vehicle by the month and year it was manufactured. Do not use the model year. You may find the age on the manufacturer's compliance label located in the doorframe area of the vehicle. If no compliance label is attached, you should contact the manufacturer to find out the exact date that the vehicle was manufactured and obtain a letter from the manufacturer as proof of age of the vehicle.
    • The vehicle is a bus manufactured before January 1, 1971.
    • The vehicle was originally manufactured and certified to meet Canadian safety standards. These vehicles are imported by either importers authorized by Transport Canada or by former residents of Canada returning to live in Canada who are bringing back the same vehicle they exported.
    • The vehicle is entering Canada temporarily. There are five types of temporary imports:
      • vehicles imported by visitors for a period not exceeding 12 months, temporary residents such as students studying at an institution of learning for the duration of their studies in Canada, or individuals with valid work permits/ authorizations for employment for a period not exceeding 36 months;
      • vehicles imported by diplomats, if authorization in writing has been granted from Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, for the duration of the person's posting in Canada;
      • vehicles imported by visiting forces personnel for the duration of their assignment in Canada;
      • vehicles imported by U.S. preclearance personnel and their dependents for the duration of the U.S. officer's posting in Canada; and
      • vehicles imported for exhibition, demonstration, evaluation, testing or special purposes. The importer must submit written authorization from Transport Canada for temporary importations of this nature if the vehicle is imported by a Canadian resident.
     
  10. TahoeFever

    TahoeFever Epic Member 5+ Years 500 Posts

    Note: Vehicles imported temporarily under one of these conditions cannot be sold or otherwise disposed of while in Canada, and it cannot remain in Canada longer than the time constraints listed on the person's work permit, student visa, or other customs or immigration document. Once these time limits have been exceeded, the vehicle no longer qualifies for temporary entry and must be exported. Should the temporary status of the person entering the vehicle change while they are in Canada, the vehicle will have to be either permanently imported, if it qualifies, or exported.
     

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