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Any Power Steering pump replacement tips?

Discussion in 'General Chevy & GM Tech Questions' started by Pikey, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. Crawdaddy

    Crawdaddy Epic Member Staff Member 5+ Years 1000 Posts Platinum Contributor

    One tip with the pulley installer. If you use the typical installer available at AutoZone or Harbor Freight, you have to turn a nut while holding the jackscrew in place. Make sure you hold the jackscrew in place and turn the nut evenly. Otherwise the pulley will start going on crooked. No matter what I did, the pulley didn't want to go on straight at first, but it straightened out as I kept going.
  2. Pikey

    Pikey Moderator Staff Member 2 Years ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    Last edited: Oct 19, 2012
  3. Pikey

    Pikey Moderator Staff Member 2 Years ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    The pump should be here next week sometime. I am having the front diff rebuilt under warranty (I hope) at the beginning of the week. So, I started soaking the pully and shaft joint down with croil (claims to creep into a 1 one millionth of and inch). Hopefully by midweek it will penetrate enough that the pully comes off with no issue. The inner threads on the shaft are pretty rusty, Hope I can screw the tool into it without to much work.
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2012
  4. j cat

    j cat Rockstar 3 Years 1000 Posts

    the penitrating oil you used does work quite well. the metal threads should be cleaned with a wire brush of the proper size shape to clean up those rusted threads.

    the threaded bore can be cleaned with a pipe wire brush with some wd-40 to aid in the cleaning.

    If you find the pulley does not want to come off try some heat with a small propane torch [small tip] heating the shaft area of the pulley should break the bond. you should not need much heat to get it off.
  5. Pikey

    Pikey Moderator Staff Member 2 Years ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    I will have to see what size threads they are when I rent the tool, as i do not have a thread gauge here and internal threads in a diameter that small are kinda hard to read with a gauge anyway. I may have a tap that I can run thru it to clean them up.
  6. j cat

    j cat Rockstar 3 Years 1000 Posts

    using a tap may remove material then cause a failure. you can get small dia wire pipe brushes 1/8-1/4 inch

    after you clean out the threads then wash out the oil with a solvent. that way the tool will lock in secure.
  7. Pikey

    Pikey Moderator Staff Member 2 Years ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    I have the pipe brushes. The job I used to have involved rebuilding old foundry equipment. I used to spend hours cleaning with air and brushes, then brush and brake clean, then air, then tap them all. These holes were filled with sand, rust, water, you name it.
  8. Crawdaddy

    Crawdaddy Epic Member Staff Member 5+ Years 1000 Posts Platinum Contributor

    Right. I found that if I tried to get lazy and hold the big nut that's doing the pressing stationary and rotate the jack screw, it wanted to try to walk on very crooked. Turning that big nut while holding the jack screw stationary in the engine compartment is not as easy as it seems, but is unfortunately the only way to get it done. It should be easier since you have plenty of space with the e-fans.

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