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Anyone install bathroom fan before?

Discussion in 'The Coffee Shop ~ Chit Chat' started by vncj96, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. vncj96

    vncj96 New Member 1000 Posts

    I have an old house built in 1938, I need to install a bathroom fan, is it gonna just be easier to pull the ceiling (plaster) to put in a fan? I a bedroom above the bathroom so attic isn't a possibility. Plus just what I have had to do with other projects in this house it's easy to see their wasn't much of standards back in to 30s, any suggestions tips would be appreciated. Yeah I could call someone or check some other forum but I trust this one more then anything else!
  2. BRB46

    BRB46 Member

    Removing the plaster ceiling will definitely be the easiest way. You will need to have access to vent it to the outside as well. Depending on which way the framing run you may be able to just remove a section of ceiling. Also depends on where you will get power from. If you are handy with installing Sheetrock and taping and finishing it. I say go for it. Hope that helps.
  3. summitwhite11

    summitwhite11 Member

    You are kind of in a rock and a hard spot with that, its going to be a latt and plaster ceiling, one could cut a hole in the latts and pick up a floor joist to mount it to, however, you still have the issue of venting the moist air outside, prolly going to have 2x8 floor joist with no crawl space to run the exhaust duct work to the outside, and cutting holes in the floor joist is always a bad idea, the electric is prolly going to be paper shield which is old school way back with screw in glass/ceramic fuses with a box that is carrying to much load(amps) as it is.
    What would be ideal is if your bathroom was on an outside wall so you can install and vent out thru the wall rather then the ceiling. If you do have to cut holes in a few floor joist, be sure to sister in some additonal floor joist and scab in some cross members to beef up what you lost in cutting holes in the floor/ceiling joist. good luck, hey Like BRB said, you might get lucky and have the joist running towards the outside wall.
  4. RayVoy

    RayVoy Active Member 1000 Posts

    [MENTION=63509]summitwhite11[/MENTION] has the right idea; but, you need to be on an outside wall. If, by any chance, you are on an outside wall, build an enclosure on the wall large enough to mount the fan and the fan's metal can. The box needs to be large enough to also hold a 3" 90 deg elbow. Where the elbow points at the exterior wall, use a hole saw to cut a hole through the wall (I usually pass a long 3/8, or 5/16 drill bit through the wall first, mark where it comes through the outside wall. Using the hole to center the hole saw, cut part way from the inside and part way from the outside, then there will be a nice smooth cut).

    I have also installed then on the ceiling, with the exhaust hole pointing at the outside wall.

    I have also installed on the ceiling and gone up to exhaust. You need to be lucky and have a closet above the bathroom; but if there is a closet, hide the exhaust pipe inside the closet (in a corner is preferred). I then like to build a sheetrock cover inside the closet to box it in.

    Hard to call wiring without being there, but I usually cut small channels (or holes) to get the wire inside the wall and then part with small strips of sheetrock. The best plan is to run the wire from the light fixture (then fan runs when light is on).

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