Bilstein 5100's on 2wd Z71

Discussion in 'Lifted & Offroad Suspension' started by mah2496, May 5, 2012.

  1. moogvo

    moogvo Epic Member 5+ Years 1000 Posts

    Ride height adjustable shocks are not intended to ALTER your ride height, They are adjustable to work with different height suspension setups. The truck is WAY too heavy to use a shock absorber as a device to create lift. A shock simply doesn't have the strength to bear the load of your truck on it's own.

    Coil-over shocks, on the other hand, CAN give you a minimal amount of lift because part of the assembly is a coil spring. It works on some level as a helper spring. They work well on vehicles where there is spring wear and weakening of the springs, but not as a replacement of the springs. The very nature of the name of the part in question "Shock Absorber" is descriptive enough to tell you what it's function is: to absorb impacts of uneven surfaces that you encounter while driving... to Absorb Shock... It is not a lift kit.
     
  2. SurrealOne

    SurrealOne Former Member ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    And as shock absorbers weaken over time (which they all do), what do you think will happen if you're depending on them for lift? Coil-overs have the coild to prevent such sag ... but shock absorbers don't. The solution to this dilemma, I think, is to get a lift kit to go with your shocks.
     
  3. moogvo

    moogvo Epic Member 5+ Years 1000 Posts

    :great: +1 on that. I like the saying "Do it once and do it right". It's one thing to lift your coffee table with bricks, but a motor vehicle can quickly become a rolling block of death if something goes wrong. It isn't worth the chance taken or the money saved by doing it improperly.
     
  4. aloxdaddy99

    aloxdaddy99 Rockstar 3 Years 1000 Posts

    I understand where you are coming from [MENTION=50075]SurrealOne[/MENTION] and [MENTION=12002]moogvo[/MENTION] but I have to disagree. The shocks that the OP got are ride height adjustable. Before I got the ones I purchased I looked into the Bilsteins. The reason I didn't go with them is because of the part that does the "lifting". It seemed like a weak point to me. However it will raise the height of the front of the vehicle. Rancho also make a form of a "lift" shock. The shock itself as stated before does not actually lift the truck. The lift comes from the position of the spring on the body of the shock.
     
  5. SurrealOne

    SurrealOne Former Member ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    Ok, after reading this I'll consider myself a bit more educated. However, since the OP can't seem to get the proper position, I think we're still back to him needing a lift kit of some kind. I also think there's still a concern for sagging across the long term as the shock absorber wears.

    Thoughts?
     
  6. aloxdaddy99

    aloxdaddy99 Rockstar 3 Years 1000 Posts

    The "sag" i would worry about is in the spring. The issue the OP has is that he doesn't/didn't have a spring compressor that is small enough to compress the spring enough to move the spring up the shock body. I had a similar issue when I was helping a family member to replace the shocks on his mini cooper. I am always a little uneasy when it comes to disassembly of shocks/springs. There is a lot of energy in those springs.
     
  7. moogvo

    moogvo Epic Member 5+ Years 1000 Posts

    There are no shocks that can safely be used as a lift kit. Adjustable ride height shocks allow you to slightly tune your height, but are not a lift solution. It is not the job of a shock absorber to carry the load of a vehicle, and the shock absorber mounting points on a vehicle are not intended or rated to take such a load. To lift a truck properly and safely requires expensive components that retain the original geometry of a vehicle's suspension that are designed to carry the load placed on them.

    I get it that some shocks have coil springs on them. These are not designed to REPLACE original springs, they can help with ride stiffness and maybe even compensate for a partially collapsed spring. They can help you level your vehicle out but they are not intended to be a lift.

    If they worked that way, people wouldn't spend thousands in money and time to buy lift kits, they would just force oversized shocks under their trucks and then dial them all the way up. you would be better off to cram a block of wood into the springs.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2012
  8. catmechanic07

    catmechanic07 Former Member

    :confused: This guy is talking about 5100 Bilsteins on his truck. His signature has me thrown........he has a Z71 2wd? All Z71's are 4x4 with an off road package. Is it possible that he really does have a 2wd and has the wrong part for his truck?
     
  9. SurrealOne

    SurrealOne Former Member ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    If I'm not mistaken they changed that with the NNBS. I seem to recall reading somewhere that NNBS trucks had a Z71 option for 2WD trucks that included the decals and skid plates ... and that NNBS trucks that were Z71's and 4WD would say "Z71 Offroad" or "Z71 4x4"...
     
  10. catmechanic07

    catmechanic07 Former Member

    I looked on the net and cant find anything but 4x4's listed as NBS models. Most are 2500's and the 1500's are all 4x4's. Maybe Im wrong.....I been known to be wrong once or twice in my life.......LOL!
     

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