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Chevy Ls1500 ran out of Gas now will not start

Discussion in 'General Chevy & GM Tech Questions' started by jgg765, Mar 4, 2013.

  1. jgg765

    jgg765 New Member

    Hi I am posting this information for a friend of mine.
    The SUV is a 2000 Chevy 4X4 LS 1500
    The problem is that his daughter was driving it and ran out of gas.
    Filled it back up with gas and it still will not start.
    It seems like the Fuel delivery system cannot get fuel to the Engine.
    He has checked the relay and tried bypassing the relay and still did not have any luck.
    He has not changed the fuel pump yet but his friend thinks that might be the problem.
    Any information anyone can post would be helpful Thank you so much.
  2. Pikey

    Pikey Moderator Staff Member ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    Before I replaced the fuel pump I would put a fuel pressure gauge on it and see what (if any) pressure he is getting. The pumps in these trucks do not like to be run dry. They use fuel to keep cool.
  3. vncj96

    vncj96 New Member 1000 Posts

    Fuel pump most likely dead, as stated above, they dont like to be run dry
  4. Skippy

    Skippy Member

    What this means "don't like to be run dry" is that the fuel pumps remain cool by remaining submerged in the gas tank. The fluid around the sealed pump dissipates heat build up. If you've run your tank dry, at the very least, you were operating the fuel pump in high heat conditions, which is often enough to burn it out. As a good rule of thumb, keep your gas tank above 1/4 and always above 1/8th to avoid the heat-caused failures. Unfortunately, many customers learn about this good practice only after they've burned through their first pump.

    This applies to virtually all fuel pumps these days (most are in-tank designs), and is good practice across all makes and models of in-tank pump systems.

    Cheers,

    -Skippy

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