1. Chevy Truck Forum

    Welcome To GMTruckClub.com!

    The #1 Chevy Truck Forum Online

    Online since 2004, we're the #1 Chevy Truck & SUV user community. If you have any questions about your Chevy or GMC Truck, SUV or Crossover, or just want to connect with other GM owners and enthusiasts around the world, you've found the best place on the internet to do that.

    Join Today ~ It's Free

    Registering is Free and Easy! Do it today and we'll see you on the forums soon!

Cleaning up bolt threads

Discussion in 'Chevy Truck Talk & GM News' started by Big_Mike, Aug 13, 2012.

Newest Gallery Photos

  1. Big_Mike

    Big_Mike Member 100 Posts

    I have some bolts that had a lot of build up and gunk in the threads and I recently cleaned them up using a wire wheel, but it also removed the finish. Does anyone know of any good way to restore the finish? I want to prevent rust from occurring. I know that restoration pros reuse old bolts and I am wanting to do the same. Thanks.
     
  2. RayVoy

    RayVoy Well-Known Member 2 Years 1000 Posts

    A lot of different finishes Mike, where were the bolts used?
     
  3. Big_Mike

    Big_Mike Member 100 Posts

    Bolts off of the intake manifold, the bell housing, and exhaust manifolds. They are coated with a black oxide finish.
     
  4. RayVoy

    RayVoy Well-Known Member 2 Years 1000 Posts

    Some bolts can be reused, I would not reuse exhaust man bolts (heat damage). The intake and the bell housing require bolts that can be properly torqued. I doubt if these old bolts can now be torqued with any reliability (my $0.02).
     
  5. Big_Mike

    Big_Mike Member 100 Posts

    I gotcha, RayVoy. Much obliged. Would you know where I could purchase some new bolts for the intake manifold and bellhousing? I haven't had any fortune yet, but I keep searching. Ones from junk yards probably won't be much better in condition... Being a '93 model and all... Unless other intake manifold bolts on newer trucks will work... Thanks again.
     
  6. RayVoy

    RayVoy Well-Known Member 2 Years 1000 Posts

    Auto parts guys should be able to help. The guys who sell overhaul kits for engines (not the guys selling oil and spark plugs).

    If I couldn't find them at a parts store, I'd try a shop that offers engine rebuild services.
     
  7. tbplus10

    tbplus10 Epic Member Staff Member 5+ Years 5000 Posts Platinum Contributor

    Big Mike if you cant find them at an auto parts store try on-line at places like Jegs, or Summit, or if you have a local Fastenal store.
    If it's a bolt requiring a torque your normally better off replacing it, bolts stretch and after being torqued once or twice are not considered able to give a reliable torque reading if reused.
     
  8. Big_Mike

    Big_Mike Member 100 Posts

    Thanks for the info, I appreciate it. I will do some homework. I know of some local spots to check out and I will check online.
     
  9. aloxdaddy99

    aloxdaddy99 Rockstar 3 Years 1000 Posts

    Try LMCtruck. They have parts for trucks going way back.
    As was said before reusing bolts with a torque spec is not a wise Idea.
     
  10. The Heater

    The Heater Member 2 Years 100 Posts

    Fasteners that are torqued can be re-used. However, there are some applications that you want to just replace them. Your main query is about putting black oxide back on the fastener or in cleaning them up to re-use them.

    Here is what I do if I re-use fasteners. 1) run the fastener through the correct size/pitch/thread count die to clean the threads. If threads are mucky, then I will clean with a solvent. I usually use kerosene, paint thinner or Toluene. Alcohol won't work well because it is not a non polar solvent; 2) clean the fastener (see previous text, or if not too bad, clean with BrakeClean or equivalent).

    To buy new fasteners, you often have the option of using an industrial fastener supplier that sells retail. Best pricing. It is what I do if I don't use the dealer, which I do for a lot of fasteners to make sure they look exactly the same as what was in there. They also carry some automotive specialty fasteners. You simply bring in what you have, and they will match it up with the correct grade fastener for your application. Black oxide coating and all. If you don't have access to a fastener supplier, then either the dealer or LMS is what I recommend.

    If I have a set of fasteners and some look beat up, I just buy all new ones. If I have to clean up more than maybe 4-6, I may just replace them. Less labor intensive. And if it is an important fastener on the engine, I just replace it with a new one.
     

Share This Page