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Cold Air intakes...

Discussion in 'Chevy Truck Accessories' started by A_Clutts, Apr 8, 2013.

  1. CatastropheADJ

    CatastropheADJ New Member

    I agree both ways. You can't really argue with the facts about the K&n set up. It's a little steep price wise but the warranty is 2nd to none. Then you can always make one yourself for half the price and it'd prolly do the same.
  2. silverhobey

    silverhobey Rockstar 3 Years 500 Posts

    Question...what is an MIT....? Thanks, Brian from Canada
  3. tbplus10

    tbplus10 Epic Member Staff Member 5+ Years 5000 Posts Platinum Contributor

    Modular Intake Tube

    Definition:
    Modular Intake Tubes (MIT) can improve airflow up to 400 CFM over a restrictive stock intake tube. Made from cross-linked, high-density polyethylene, Modular Intake Tubes straighten out air flow by providing a smooth, unrestricted path that increases air flow to the engine. MITs can be used with the stock air box, or with intake systems.
  4. CatastropheADJ

    CatastropheADJ New Member

    Beat me to it!
  5. Fisherman

    Fisherman New Member

    I know I'm resurrecting an old thread by months, but much of what y'all are saying just isn't true, at least according to empiracle data created by Black Bear Performance, one of your sponsors on this forum.

    They did a dyno test of a bone stock 2008 Silverado with the 5.3L engine and tested darned near every CAI on the market...and included a ringer, a stock air box and filter coupled with an Airaid MIT. The stock air box and filter w/the Airaid MIT performed at least as well, if not better than all the other complete CAI setups, including the K&N, which tells us the high flow, low resistance filters, like K&N, do nothing to improve performance at all.

    You can see the dyno test posted here, on another forum. Don't know if Black Bear posted the results here. (removed link; mfleetwood)

    Now, before you slam the messenger, just read the results. Why would Black Bear fudge or lie about their dyno results?

    It does seem the stock air box and filter has never been the restrictive point in the full sized GM trucks, just the air tube itself. The dyno results show that quite clearly. So I wonder why, then, people insist upon installing all these hyper flowing air filters on otherwise stock trucks that will have no benefit other than making your truck louder and introducing more grit/dirt into the engine, making your oil and oil filter work harder than necessary. Unless you've made the jump to forced air induction (turbo/supercharging) and/or have made large internal engine changes (hotter cam, port/polish heads, new intake like the marine intake, long tube headers, etc.), the stock air box flows perfectly well and is not a restriction to what the engine can require, even at WOT.

    Now, I know K&N shows their filter flows better. Sure it does. It's more open, but consequently, as you make the air filter flow more air, you also introduce more dirt. Cannot have it both ways. Think about it....for instance, if the K&N filter flowed more air AND filtered the air better than stock, wouldn't you see results of testing showing just that? And since there is a standardized test, ISO 5011, why does K&N never show their results of that testing? I'd think since K&N obviously must ace this test, they'd be trumpeting that all over their marketing....but they don't.

    The issue for K&N is that the real numbers are all there in the Spicer report. Rather than taking the high road and marketing the product for what it is, a washable filter that sacrifices filtration ability for airflow and is chiefly useful only in modified engines and trusting the consumers to understand the inherent trade-offs, they are relying up shady marketing and astroturfing.

    This is a shame because, as a racing part, the filters are actually quality parts. It's just that, as with other parts like choke-less carbs, high-lift cams, racing slicks, and race-compound brake pads, K&N filters are not the ideal compromise for street use.
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 25, 2013

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