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every 30k or 100k on differentials?

Discussion in 'GM Powertrain' started by theflatlander, Feb 19, 2014.

  1. JimmyA

    JimmyA Member 1 Year 100 Posts

    I would like to know the procedure and amount for each? I have 30,000mi on my 2010 and would like to change the transfer and rear. I am not a mudder and avoid water as I can, but chit happens sometimes!
     
  2. Cowpie

    Cowpie Member 1 Year 100 Posts

    You can find all the capacities for your particular vehicle at the amsoil site, even if you don't use their stuff. They will tell you the fluid or lube you need for each component and the capacities.

    http://www.amsoil.com/mygarage/vehiclelookuppage.aspx

    The diffs are simple. The rear, just loosen up the bolts on the cover. Pop it loose and all the lube will run out into your catch pan, or the floor if you are not ready. Then take out all the bolts, take the cover off, wipe it out and wipe down the gasket. Not sure about the 2010, but my 2013 gasket was reusable. You might want a gasket on hand. I recommend Lube Locker brand. They are excellent gaskets that are reusable.

    http://lubelocker.com/collections/axles/gm

    After cleaning things up, reinstall everything. snug up the bolts, doing opposite ones at a time, in a clockwise fashion. Then tighten them down, again, opposite ones in a clock wise pattern. Take them down to about 35-37 lb torque. I have been at this a long, long time so I just do it by feel. Then you take out the fill plug if you have not done so already, and fill 'er up. I like a synthetic 75w90. Mobil 1 75w90 is a good one I recommend, I use the Amsoil Severe Gear 75w90. Fill to the bottom of the fill hole. If you over fill, let it run out and get back down to the bottom of the fill hole.

    The transfer is easy. A simple drain plug down low and a fill plug above and offset to it. Drain and fill with Dexron VI auto trans fluid. Here again, I like the Amsoil Signature ATF. Wipe off the magnetic drain plug before putting it back on.
     
  3. Pikey

    Pikey Moderator Staff Member 3 Years ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    One should always make sure that the fill plug can be removed BEFORE draining any fluids. I can tell you horror stories about guys draining their T-case or front diff and not being able to refill it. We can not assume that his T-Case Dexron trans fluid. Many GM t-cases require the GM Auto-Trac II fluid. My 2005 uses trac II. Which at this time I do not believe that anyone makes an equivalent. I also used the Amsoil Severe gear 75w-90 in my rear end. After 500 miles it developed a odd noise. I talked to my gear guy and he said that he has seen it happen with synthetic gear oils. I switched it out to conventional and my rear end noise disappeared.
     
  4. Cowpie

    Cowpie Member 1 Year 100 Posts

    I didn't assume anything. that is why I told him to look up at the Amsoil site and they would show which lube or fluid should go in which component and how much.

    Well, on the synthetic gear lubes, I got sold on them with my commercial trucks. Been getting factory fills of synthetic lubes in diffs and transmissions since the mid 90's. The manufacturers will extend the normal 500,000 mile warranty out to 750,000 miles if synthetics are used in these components. And I have never lost a diff or a transmission in almost 4 million miles with commercial trucks. So, my last two 4x4's have gotten synthetic lubes in the diffs and gear boxes almost right from the start.

    But, to each his own.
     

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