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Greasing the suspension parts

Discussion in 'Chevy C/K Truck Forum' started by dvferrara, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. dvferrara

    dvferrara New Member

    I like to do my own oil changes but every once in a while I still bring my truck to Jiffy Lube or something so they can grease all the suspension parts. Can anybody tell me which parts I need to grease so I can do it by myself? I have never used a grease gun before but from what I hear it is just like a caulk gun. Any help is much appreciated!
     
  2. tbplus10

    tbplus10 Epic Member Staff Member 5+ Years 5000 Posts Platinum Contributor

    Starting from the rear:
    Driveshaft U-joints, if they have zert fittings, if you have a carrier bearing there should be 4 U-joints, no carrier bearing 2 U-joints.
    Carrier Bearing, if it has zert fittings. For carrier bearings without zert fittings if I remember I'll normally put a needle point tip on the greese gun, peel back the seal edge and shoot a little greese in.
    Front suspension should have anywhere from 4 to 8 zert fittings, you'll have to look around for them, if you see a grease boot on a joint there should be a zert fitting somewhere nearby.
    Proper technique for grease gun use is to wipe off any debri or old grease from the zert fitting, connect up and pump in grease, watch for a small amount of grease seeping out of the joint, that should be enough. Disconnect and wipe off any grease from the zert and where it was seeping out.
    On grease boots be careful not to continue pumping the boot full as this can cause them to split open and require replacing.
    Grease gun is very easy to use mostly just squeezing the handle.
    You want a grease gun with a flexible hose, it'll make it easier to reach certain zert fittings.
    Make sure when your connecting to fittings you hear or feel it click on to the fitting to prevent shooting grease all over things you dont intend on lubing.
    Not all suspensions will be the same, some companies use non-serviceable bearings i.e. certain U-joints dont have zert fittings, or certain pivot points wont have fittings as the manufacturer has made them what they term non-serviceable or maintenance free, supposedly lifetime no maintenance parts so dont be surprised if you find very few grease points under your truck.
     
  3. dvferrara

    dvferrara New Member

    That was exactly what I was looking for. Thanks for your help!
     
  4. aloxdaddy99

    aloxdaddy99 Rockstar 3 Years 1000 Posts

    The only thing I would add to the list is sometimes you may have to hold the gun in one hand and hold the hose to the zerk fitting to keep it from squeezing out between the fitting and the hose. This may happen if your undercarriage is caked with mud. The mud will "lock" the zerk closed. I have used a punch to push in the center of the zerk to "unlock" it. Other than not adding to much grease as tb mentioned make sure you use the same grease. Not all greases are compatible. But a general automotive grease would be fine.
     
  5. Scott_Anderson

    Scott_Anderson Member 2 Years 100 Posts

    Not all those grease monkey shops do the suspension lubrication anyway.
    I've had my truck to one here in the last 3 months, and in the process of working on my front end ABS problems I noticed that the lube points were not being greased they were quite dry and caked with dirt.
    Needless to say I grabbed my grease gun and gave them a good dose of grease.

    So much for trying to stimulate the economy, I guess I'll start doing my own oil changes now again too.
     
  6. dvferrara

    dvferrara New Member

    Yea I don't trust those guys. Plus I just can't justify paying almost $40 dollars at jiffy lube and being told I need an air filter when I know for a fact that I don't. It cost $15 bucks to do it myself.

    ---------- Post added at 07:02 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:01 PM ----------

    Is there any certain 'brand' of grease gun that is known to be good? I really know nothing about this haha
     
  7. aloxdaddy99

    aloxdaddy99 Rockstar 3 Years 1000 Posts

    I don't know if there is a "brand" on grease guns. I bought mine from autozone. I also bought a small plastic container from WalMart to keep it in. It never seems to fail when I put it away I always get grease all over everything. Just an FYI.
     
  8. ChevyHD

    ChevyHD Rockstar 100 Posts

    Make sure you know how to load a grease gun. when you pull the t-handle down and lock it, make sure you dont jar it loose while there's an open tube of grease in there. Also, make sure the top cap is tight before you unlock the t-handle and push it up. There's usually an air release on the top that you need to crack to release the air and get a good seal also. Just some things I learned the hard way.
     
  9. ticketman

    ticketman New Member

    I have a 2011 1500 Silverado. The only zerk fittings I found were on the outter tie-rod ends. Upper ball joints, lower ball joints, etc are all sealed. Are all the 1500's like this? Am I missing something?
     

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