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Is a Cold Air Intake (CAI kit) worth it?

Discussion in 'Performance & Fuel' started by jworm, Jan 18, 2014.

  1. Cowpie

    Cowpie Member 1 Year 100 Posts

    And that would be true. The MM Act does put the burden of proof on the manufacturer and not the consumer. The Federal Trade Commission recently put out a position statement that reiterates this because they saw a number of instances where OEM's were taking liberty with the regulation. The FTC decided to reaffirm that the burden of proof is on the manufacturer. The OEM is counting on the public to be unaware of the MM Act, or how it is to be applied. It is a very simple read. Not like some sort of Obamacare kind of paperwork nightmare. Most good legislation is simple.

    Now as this pertains to ECM tunes, as long as someone doesn't go extremely goofy, any of the marketed tune products will not cause the engine to exceed it's design parameters. They don't want to get a flood of lawsuits on themselves for blowing up people's engines. And since most of, at least, the canned tunes that come in these products will not take any engine beyond it's design parameters, there should be no issues.

    Keep in mind, the stock tunes are what they are because the OEM has to deal with a lot of owner issues. People putting in sub grade cheap fuel, not driving the vehicle properly and in fact actually being very abusive. The OEM's have to cover their bacon, so they are very conservative on how they tune the engine. Those that are more conscientious about their vehicles, how the operate them, and what they put in them, really have no worries using a performance tuning product from a reputable source.

    Now, I am getting ready to do a Diablo tune on my 2013 Silverado that I bought late last May. Just wanted to get about 10,000 miles on the engine before doing it. I custom tuned a 2006 Jeep Liberty Diesel that I had and now my son owns. It was done under warranty, the dealer knew it, and there never was any issues. Dealer never even hinted that it was a problem, even when I needed a couple of glow plugs replaced under warranty. They knew about the tune because I told them not to reflash the ECM because it had a custom tune. They complied with my request. When you are confident of what you know, and you assert yourself in a firm, yet non asinine way, most dealers are not going to go out of their way to play these kind of games. Oh, and the Jeep dealer I referenced, is the same Chevy dealer that I got my Silverado from, so the brand had nothing to do with it.

    All of this is why I have no problem with tunes, CAI's, custom exhausts, etc for anything I own. I use good sense and am primarily interested in efficiency as opposed to racing. I have tuned and customed out my commercial semi trucks (tunes, turbos, manifolds, etc) and my personal vehicles. Never lost a minute of sleep.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2014
  2. TimTom64b

    TimTom64b Member 2 Years 500 Posts ROTM Winner Gold Member

    Exactly...
     
  3. the phantom

    the phantom Active Member 2 Years ROTM Winner Gold Member 1000 Posts

    I never knew they made them in diesel. Cool!:shocked:
     
  4. Cowpie

    Cowpie Member 1 Year 100 Posts

    Yep, got lucky. Only 11,000 were made for the N. American market. Only cost me $500 more than the standard 3.7 V6. It is a 2.8L inline 4 cyl, cast iron block, wet sleeved, dual OHC, Bosch common rail fuel injection with about 19,000 psi at the tips, with a Garrett VG turbo pumping the air. Almost the same torque as my 5.3L V8 in my 2013 Silverado. It was EPA certified at 27 mpg on highway. I typically got 33+ on the highway. It had the 545 auto trans from behind the 5.7 hemi in it. My son owns it now and loves it. Fantastic ride. Many days, I miss it.
     
  5. dobey

    dobey Rockstar 3 Years 100 Posts

    Just to re-affirm this. I get the same from my dealer where I bought my Avalanche. My service rep knows I prefer to do my own repairs and such when possible, and there is no problem. I tell them to leave the washable filter alone, and they do. Even with the Firestone repair shop, where I've taken cars for state inspection, I make it clear that I do my own work (unless the work is above and beyond the resources I have), and they are respectful about it.

    If you really know what you are doing, and what you are talking about, and do so confidently and assertively in a respectful manner, then most places will be respectful about it in return.
     
  6. JimmyA

    JimmyA Member 1 Year 100 Posts

    I somewhat agree with your argument! You will feel the added air @ WOT, and then you will result in "LOWER MPG", there! That is the only time, that you will see any improvements! If you or anyone else wants to drive around, while in "WOT", enjoy your ride! There is no reason, to believe that a CAI, will add efficiency!!!!!! punctuation, police, I'm sorry!
     
  7. dobey

    dobey Rockstar 3 Years 100 Posts

    There is not reason to assume that it won't, either. Like I said, there are hundreds of variables that determine the power and efficiency of the engine. There's more to an intake system than just flow rate (CFM). The entire point of a true CAI is not to necessarily increase the CFM, but the density of the air. The volume of air that can fill the intake manifold, and the intake system prior to entering the throttle body, also have an effect. People like to talk about "restriction" because it's an easy thing to talk about, but there really is a lot more to it than that.

    You really should learn more about how these things work; especially if your job is operating a dyno.
     
  8. JimmyA

    JimmyA Member 1 Year 100 Posts

    I know more than you think! I am still say'ing that a CAI addition is a waste of $$$$, because you already have one! NUFF said! Oh, I meant !!!!!!!!! My last post to this Thread....... PERIOD, police! I apologize.
     
  9. 09 Z71 4x4

    09 Z71 4x4 Member

    I did a drop in K&N filter and an Airaid Modular Intake Tube. The stock air box flows really well. Save your money for better upgrades. All I got was a lot more sound under the hood with the tube more flow more noise. Computer adapts/adjust to changes, I'm not saying it helps or hurts.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2014
  10. BornAgainBiker55

    BornAgainBiker55 Rockstar 100 Posts

    When I was researching to put my AirAid on, I liked what one member said. Something like "if you're happy you did it, it's worth it." and that's true for just about any mod. I put the AidAid on mine, and I like the looks of the bay much better. I barely noticed a better engine "response" at WOT. Gains were minimal at best, but I like it and that's all that matters in the end. It's your truck, you spent the tens of thousands to buy it, do what you want.

    My opinion is it was worth it to get the "maintenance free" meaning no-oil reusable filter with the AirAid full kit, it looks nicer and it's nice to just wash out the filter and let it dry overnight. I'd do it again on another truck
     

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