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New to Hauling. Get a few pointers?

Discussion in 'Towing & Trailer Tech' started by darkness-lies-, Apr 25, 2012.

  1. darkness-lies-

    darkness-lies- Member 2 Years 100 Posts

    Hello i have a 2001 silverado 2wd and today im gonna have to haul a ford escort on a 16' trailer. im new to all this and any pointers would be great.
     
  2. ChevyFan

    ChevyFan November Beard Grower - Cancer Fighter Staff Member 5+ Years 5000 Posts

    moved to towing section.
     
  3. moogvo

    moogvo Epic Member 5+ Years 1000 Posts

    A 1/2 ton truck isn't the ideal platform to transport cars on. The transmission, suspension and brakes are not designed for it. I wouldn't recommend it for long distances and not at all without an auxiliary transmission cooler.

    I stand to offend a lot of people with this statement, but a 1/2 ton truck is really a homeowner grade vehicle that has no more ability than the impala/caprice and ltd wagons of yesteryear when it comes to power and towing.

    I had a 1970 LTD with a 429 under the hood that could have towed circles around my truck. It could haul almost as much with the trunk the size of a small apartment complex.

    If you are going to tow, make sure you are within the tow ratings as outlined in your manual. Be careful, go slow and allow extra space between you and the car in front of you to give yourself extra distance to stop your load. There will be no panic stops with a load like that.
     
  4. darkness-lies-

    darkness-lies- Member 2 Years 100 Posts

    sorry steve my mistake been away for awhile. I understand and by no means offended. it was i use my truck or my buddy tries to use is ford f-150 v6. thanks for the pointers. luckily there aren't any hills its all pretty flat driving
     
  5. ahmitchell1

    ahmitchell1 Rockstar 4 Years ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    The only half ton I've ever used to haul a car was my dads Tahoe one time because I had no choice. It handled it the car very well, but the Tahoe has load level
     
  6. moogvo

    moogvo Epic Member 5+ Years 1000 Posts

    A buddy of mine hauled an explorer sport (2door) about 35 miles with an 01 Suburban on a rented aluminum U-Haul trailer. I swear that the trailer coupling was no more than 2 inches off of the ground and it struggled to get going.
     
  7. ahmitchell1

    ahmitchell1 Rockstar 4 Years ROTM Winner 1000 Posts


    Thats what I imagined when I bought my race cobra but the air ride brought the Tahoe back to level
     
  8. moogvo

    moogvo Epic Member 5+ Years 1000 Posts

    You know... SLIGHTLY off topic here, but this is a great opportunity to talk about a product I have used in the past. my Chevy truck ownership began with a '95 C1500 W/T V6/5 Speed. I got it on the cheap and it had low miles and looked great. I towed a 1977 Sunline 24' Travel Trailer with it. It did not like it one bit starting off, so I traded it for a '95 Z71 American Luxury Coach conversion. The camper squatted the rear end on the Z every time I towed it. Then, while watching "Trucks!" on (in those days) TNN, Stacey did a segment on a product called "Roadmaster Active Suspension". I bought one and to my surprise, it worked EXACTLY as advertised!

    It is a collapsed spring that goes between the rear axle and the rear leaf spring hanger. It has a threaded rod that attaches it to the bracket on the eyelet of the hanger. You tighten the threaded rod until the spring opens up just enough to slide a quarter between the coils of the spring. that's it! No more sagging, no more axle wrap, no more body roll, no more squatting rear end.

    [​IMG]

    As you put a load on the rear of the truck, the Roadmaster springs act as a sort of helper, but it is a variable helper, as opposed to one of those steel helper bars you sandwich into your leaf that is really more of a spring limiter than a helper. As you increase the load on the Roadmaster, the spring gets tighter and provides more resistance, keeping your load from squatting the truck down. It is ingenious, really and I want to get a set for my van. My truck is only a V6, so I won't be towing or hauling heavy loads with it anyway.

    Check out their website! http://www.activesuspension.com/ I would not endorse it if I had not personally used and liked it!
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2012
  9. darkness-lies-

    darkness-lies- Member 2 Years 100 Posts

    hauled the car with no problems. 292544_161321420661137_100003498394338_219087_92803670_n.jpg
     
  10. Enkeiavalanche

    Enkeiavalanche Rockstar 4 Years ROTM Winner 5000 Posts

    I've towed many 20 ft trailers with show cars in them..With most of my trucks.. Just take it easy, No over speeding, Gear down on hills and make sure the car is on the trailer right and even. And you shuld have no problem. Do you have trailer brakes hooked up?
     

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