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Painful Lesson Learned

Discussion in 'Chevy Truck Accessories' started by EvilNetwork, Aug 2, 2009.

  1. EvilNetwork

    EvilNetwork New Member

    My 99 Suburban was purchased new and then immediately had a custom bumper, grill, nerf bars and fender flares installed. The whole thing including both bumpers were re-shot in GM Victory Red. I decided this summer I want to keep this and my Yukon for another 10 years at minimum and that it was time to start re-working the Suburban.

    So after we got done enjoying Baby Backs on the grill, I popped open a beer and decided to fix the embedded driving lights in my bumper. They've been out for over a year and I never took the time to trace back why. After about 20 minutes I found the culprit, a bad relay, swapped it and had it fixed. My wife looked at me and says, "What are you going to next?"

    Off comes the grill. Decided to strip it and for the short term will re-shoot with primer until I am ready to re-do the bumper.

    Here comes the lesson: Never use those Blue Mechanics Nitrile gloves for stripping paint chemically. Not only did the glove rip, but before I realized it was ripped I had paint stripper all down in the fingers. Only when the burning sensation hit did I figure out what happened. I now have 4 fingers on my right hand that look like I just came out of the swimming pool ;)
  2. L0sts0ul

    L0sts0ul New Member

    hmm.... go back to the baby backs please...
  3. Project1

    Project1 New Member

    lol that sux i only use the diamond mechanic latex gloves for that reason. have fun with your peeling hands for the next week.
  4. tbplus10

    tbplus10 Super Moderator Staff Member Platinum Contributor 1000 Posts

    Nitrile gloves are useless when used while handling chemicals, especially strippers. Chemicals usually break the glove material down and make it easier to tear, in some cases disolving the material.
    Thick rubber gloves should be used whenever possible while handling chemicals.
    Rubber gloves diminish your dexterity but thats a small price to pay for relief from chemical burns, if you've ever had chemical burns or their lasting affects I'm sure you'll agree.
  5. EvilNetwork

    EvilNetwork New Member

    I unfortunately did not have any heavy gloves but should have, that much is agreed.

    However, in my case the none of the gloves I used broke down. In fact they sat there on the floor until this afternoon. What ripped them were handling the sharp edges of the grill. Fortunately, after the first rip I quit using my hand to spread the stripper with and switched to a long handled brush. In any case, the hand isn't too bad, just looks a little funny in the fingers ;)
  6. Springthing

    Springthing New Member 1000 Posts

    Ya, I was reading about the events.. sounds all mostly good, btw, and then I got to thinking....

    ...I don't think I've ever used any kind of rubber around strippers, thick or thin, so I can't really empathize much..

    *blinks**blinksblinks*

    :)

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