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Rear End Gears

Discussion in 'Chevy Silverado Forum (GMC Sierra)' started by matzner66, Mar 20, 2009.

  1. matzner66

    matzner66 New Member

    I want to switch the 4.10's I currently have back to the stock 3.73's. Is this a big job? I have some mechanical ability like doing my own brakes, plugs, u-joints and stuff. This is on a 04 Silverado Special Edition 5.3L. Also I noticed there are alot of different sizes of 3.73's and don't have a clue what to get.
  2. Pete95Sierra

    Pete95Sierra Epic Member 5+ Years ROTM Winner 1000 Posts

    IMO going from 3.73's to 4.10's is not going to be worth the money you will spend on doing the gear install
  3. MrShorty

    MrShorty Epic Member Staff Member 5+ Years 1000 Posts

    Regearing a differential is tricky. From what I understand, the mechanical skill isn't the problem: it's getting the gears in there just right. The tolerances for Pinion depth, back lash, etc. are very narrow, there is little room for error. Because there is a certain "art" to setting up gears, most of the time it is recommended to leave it to someone experienced with the work.

    Some people often say it is cheaper/easier to find a whole new axle from a junkyard with the desired gear ratio.

    I would agree that only going "one" gear ratio different is probably not worth the cost. You don't say if you have 2wd or 4wd, but, if 4wd, you have to figure in the cost of regearing the front as well.
  4. tbplus10

    tbplus10 Epic Member Staff Member 5+ Years 5000 Posts Platinum Contributor

    Yes, for someone with limited mechanical experience. It takes a lot of trial and error, patience, and skill to get it done correctly, and thats for an experienced mechanic. This isnt a job I'd recommend for a mechanic thats never done one before, mistakes are easy to make and can be expensive.

    Theres only 1 size 3.73 thats correct for your application, you need to find what axle you have first. I'm not sure what you mean by different size 3.73's, all 3.73's are going to be the same circumfrence and tooth count.

    Like pointed out going 1 size different is kinda pointless, the savings doesnt equate to the expense.

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