Rear shock & P0013 code...

Discussion in 'Chevy Captiva Sport Forum (Saturn Vue)' started by Kggr99, Apr 26, 2017.

  1. Kggr99

    Kggr99 Member

    Hi all....

    My 2012 Captiva Sport cruised past 100k with little fanfare, until today.

    Problem #1...
    The first is a simple mechanical issue (I think, I hope).
    Leaving work today, I was walking toward my vehicle and just glanced and the rear suspension of my car. Passenger side, rear shock has a leak (or some sort of fluid is leaking from the housing). It's definitely not brake fluid, and I don't think it is any kind of grease or oil from a wheel bearing. (see below)

    Shock.JPG

    I'm fairly confident it is a simple repair.....and a couple of Monroe shocks.

    Has anyone had a similar failure?

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Problem #2...
    The second incident has me a bit more concerned.

    So I'm driving home, thinking about what needed to be done with the shocks, and then the dashboard engine light (far lower right) comes on. I stopped at a local Autozone and they pulled a P0013 code. First, I'd presume their code reader is accurate...and if so, I'm not inclined to simply throw parts at a problem to see if it resolves this issue.

    From what I've read, a P0013 code is a Bank 1 Exhaust Camshaft Position Actuator Circuit (sensor?).

    I've not visually checked (yet) to see if it's a simple unplugged wire (doubtful)....nor have I cleared the code to see if the code returns (ie, a fluke instance).

    Rock Auto has the GM (OEM) part for $37.79 (US). Autozone's part (Dorman) was $50-ish (seems over-priced). From a few YouTube videos, the Captiva's 2.4L Ecotec engine involves removing a couple of shrouds to access the sensor, then a simple bolt to remove it. Seems like a simple "shade tree" mechanic sort of repair....but we all know how this can be deceiving.

    Even found a thread on another forum with directions (and a photo)...
    http://bit.ly/2oyeLPH

    My first question would be, is this covered under GM's emission warranty (I purchased my GM Certified Captiva Sport with 9k)? I haven't asked my local Chevy dealership, but wanted to get everyone's opinion if it is even worth the effort.

    Secondly, has anyone had a similar failure?

    And lastly, is it truly this simple of a repair? Or should other things be investigated first?

    You know an old saying "bad things happen in 3's"....sure do hope I'm lucky.

    Thanks to everyone here (in advance) for their opinion and input!
     
  2. Kggr99

    Kggr99 Member

    A quick update for everyone.

    While I took my vehicle in for an oil change, I let the dealership "tell me" that I had a problem. I was curious where the conversation would go.

    They pulled the code also (P0013) and actually recommended to not do the repair right away. They recommended (as I was considering doing) that I first allow them to clear the code and see if it returned. I was shocked! I thought they would be "encouraging" me to do a repair on it.

    That said, I did forget to ask to see if this repair would be under an emission warranty....so one could say, they kicked it down the road where if it returned and it was beyond my warranty, I would incur a repair cost. I hope that's not the case.

    So I let them clear the code.....that was last week (one week ago today)....and thus far, the code hasn't returned (fingers crossed for luck).

    Honestly, from what I've read, our 2.4l engines have had this sort of problem for many years. Even saw several YouTube videos on how to replace the part (which seemed pretty easy). So I'm going to ride it out and see if the code returns.

    As for the rear shock issue....
    The dealership didn't see it (or mention it to me). I asked if they did a full inspection (I told them I was planning on a trip). So I'm equally surprised they didn't see what was obvious to me.

    I took it instead to a local repair shop. A new set of Monroe shocks (OESpectrum #37359 @ $31.99 each).....and 1hr of shop labor...and I was out the door in quick fashion. The Monroe shocks have a lifetime warranty....and the repair shop has a 1yr warranty on the labor. Total was just over $160 total...which seemed fair.

    So I'm back to "normal" (whatever that might be) for the time being.
    We'll see if the OBD-II code returns.

    Best wishes to all.
     

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