Newest Gallery Photos

  1. Chevy Truck Forum

    Welcome To GMTruckClub.com!

    The #1 Chevy Truck Forum Online

    Online since 2004, we're the #1 Chevy Truck & SUV user community. If you have any questions about your Chevy or GMC Truck, SUV or Crossover, or just want to connect with other GM owners and enthusiasts around the world, you've found the best place on the internet to do that.

    Join Today ~ It's Free

    Registering is Free and Easy! Do it today and we'll see you on the forums soon!

Think this would be possible on late model chevy pickups? Side loading, folding ramp

Discussion in 'Chevy Truck Talk & GM News' started by Bowtied, Jan 3, 2014.

  1. Bowtied

    Bowtied Rockstar 100 Posts

    Hey guys, I saw this picture of a corvair pickup and it immediatley struck me as so useful for a late model pickup, for moving furniture, motorcycles, anything that needs to be ramped up into the bed

    [​IMG]

    i've seen people cut the bed in half with a plasma cutter before (to sell in two different pieces) but this would be extremely cool to hinge the side of a late model chevy bed and have it fold up and down to use as a ramp.
     
  2. Enkeiavalanche

    Enkeiavalanche Rockstar 4 Years ROTM Winner 5000 Posts

    Great for ATV's I have seen a few of them at shows and I love um...
     
  3. Bowtied

    Bowtied Rockstar 100 Posts


    do you mean you've seen a few corvair pickups or modified pickups to have the folding/side loading ramp?
     
  4. Enkeiavalanche

    Enkeiavalanche Rockstar 4 Years ROTM Winner 5000 Posts

    The Corvair Just gotta find the pics..
     
  5. RayVoy

    RayVoy Well-Known Member 2 Years 1000 Posts

    I remember that truck, the Corvair was a nice little car, I had a convertible car.

    Was the ramp copied from the VW truck?
     
  6. BurbanMan

    BurbanMan Member 1 Year 500 Posts

    Those old Corvair ramps idea were pretty darn handy. My dad has owned 2 of them, one of which ended up with a sbc 8) no I don't have photos. I was only about 10yo when that one was around. He used the heck of them! I think it would be pretty cool to see this feature on a more modern truck.
     
  7. 99'HEARTBEAT

    99'HEARTBEAT Epic Member Staff Member 5+ Years ROTM Winner 1000 Posts Platinum Contributor

    Here's some Information, an Article on the 61" Chevrolet Corvair Side Ramp Truck,

    It is well known that the Volkswagen was a significant influence on Chevrolet’s engineering team during the creation of the Corvair (CC Here). Once the Corvair’s design team got its bread and butter sedan out the door for 1960, it shifted its attention to commercial variations. Volkswagen’s Type 2 van and pickup truck had been logical offshoots from its passenger car program. The Type 2 van (and to a lesser extent, the pickup) had been well received in Europe and were beginning to make inroads in the US. Also, Chevrolet’s product planners certainly knew that there was a similar small truck line under development at arch-rival Ford. With so much attention being given to commercial vehicles smaller than Chevrolet’s C-10 pickup and panel delivery, the world’s largest automaker was not about to ignore this market.
    [​IMG]
    Chevrolet’s new little trucks would hit the market as the 1961 Corvair 95 series. First, why 95? The number represented the wheelbase of the trucks, shortened from the 108 inch wheelbase of the of the passenger car. The vehicles were of unit construction, but utilized a rear subframe for additional support of the engine and cargo area. Mechanically, the 95s were mostly standard Corvair, right down to the rear swing axles. However, the front suspensions were largely carried over from the full sized passenger car in 1961-62 (and then from the C-10 in 1963-64). A slightly beefed up version of the Corvair sedan’s 80 horsepower engine was mated to either a Powerglide or the buyer’s choice of a 3 or 4 speed manual.
    [​IMG]
    The Corvair 95 line initially consisted of two vans and two pickups. The commercial van version was the cleverly named Corvan. Chevrolet also introduced the Corvan’s passenger-carrying offshoot, the Greenbrier. As interesting as the two little vans may be (and they will certainly warrant their own CC at some point in the future), our attention today will be devoted to the strange little pickups, which are unusual even by Corvair standards.
    [​IMG]
    Like the vans, the Corvair 95 pickups also came in two flavors - The Loadside and the Rampside. Of the two, the Loadside is the really rare one (fewer than 3000 were built between 1961 and 62) which was basically a standard Corvair pickup. The Rampside is the one remembered for its single unique quality – the hinged panel on the passenger side that lowered to become a ramp into the vehicle’s ultra-low cargo bed.
    [​IMG]
    We all know that the pickup truck has but a single reason to exist: The large open compartment in the back for carrying lots of stuff. So how do you give your customer a usable pickup when your starting point includes a rear engine? VW’s answer was to make a high flat bed with drop down side panels all the way around. Lockable storage compartments filled in the unused area under the flat bed. Chevrolet took the opposite approach. In order to maximize capacity in the bed, the Corvair 95s traded-away the flat floor. The result was a pickup bed with maximum depth in the middle of the vehicle, and a raised portion at the rear of the truck so as to accommodate the engine compartment.
    [​IMG]
    One look at the inside of the bed of one of these and you can see why the Loadside (confusingly named because you could NOT load it from the side) disappeared so quickly. With no access to the bed but through the teeny tailgate, it was singularly lacking in practical appeal. The Rampside was an ingenious workaround of the Loadside’s achilles heel and the problematic shape of the load floor of these pickups. With a bed wall that converted to a ramp, the vehicle got badly needed access to the lowest part of the bed as well as a built-in ramp not found on anything else in the industry. Although the payload was comparable to that of a conventional C-10, the inconveniently shaped bed floor cost the 95s a lot of utility points. That Chevrolet offered a plywood platform to make a flat but shallow bed did not really overcome this weakness.

    Here's the Whole Article,
    http://www.curbsideclassic.com/curb...pside-it-seemed-like-a-good-idea-at-the-time/
     
  8. BurbanMan

    BurbanMan Member 1 Year 500 Posts

    Huh. I've never seen a Corvair van!
     
  9. Enkeiavalanche

    Enkeiavalanche Rockstar 4 Years ROTM Winner 5000 Posts

    found them from Carlisle Last year... DSCF2403.jpg DSCF2404.jpg DSCF2405.jpg DSCF2607.jpg
     
  10. dave13net

    dave13net Member

    99 heartbeat.... you da man with those pics of the corvair pikum up trucks!!!! nice to see some old iron on here
     

Share This Page