GM Truck Club Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am finishing up on another car project and want to move on and remove the compressor and ac components. It has been broken for years and belt disconnected. Is it ok to remove these and gradually reinstall while the truck being useable. I would think so.

Details

No R-134a since all leaked out. Compressor clutch burned up and so did compressor.

Plan is to ( read manual, you tube, tech manual) gradually take apart, cap off open lines, reinstall, add oil, pull vacumn and put in R-134a. Never did before so will take time and want to make sure can drive it while gradually working on it.

Aware of the dangers of R-134a ( SDS sheet) and have filled before .

Also know of a good vacumn pump and gauge set for a consumer that is safe, descent quality, and a reasonable price? Don't want the lines popping or vacumn pump erupting. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
I suggest you leak test the system first and find out which component is leaking.
You can either pressurize/charge the system with R134A or pressurize with nitrogen if you have access to a tank and pressure regulator.
Then you can plan on getting the replacement parts.
Do not remove parts until you are ready to flush the lines and good components.
(Flushing is required for a locked up compressor otherwise not needed if compressor is good)
Once the lines and original components are flushed, then you can install the new parts.
Use new rubber o-rings.
Then pressurize to 200 psi. I use a "Big Blu" micro-leak detector in a spray bottle on all connections to leak test.
Liquid detergent soap and water in a spray bottle will work too.
You will need tools to vacuum and charge the system when it passes the leak test.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I suggest you leak test the system first and find out which component is leaking.
You can either pressurize/charge the system with R134A or pressurize with nitrogen if you have access to a tank and pressure regulator.
Then you can plan on getting the replacement parts.
Do not remove parts until you are ready to flush the lines and good components.
(Flushing is required for a locked up compressor otherwise not needed if compressor is good)
Once the lines and original components are flushed, then you can install the new parts.
Use new rubber o-rings.
Then pressurize to 200 psi. I use a "Big Blu" micro-leak detector in a spray bottle on all connections to leak test.
Liquid detergent soap and water in a spray bottle will work too.
You will need tools to vacuum and charge the system when it passes the leak test.
Thank you. Will do that first. Will connect belt up, charge it and look for leaks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
No need to put belt back on. Just put refrigerant thru charging port and spray soap/water solution or "Big Blue" micro leak detector in a spray bottle on all connections or monitor pressure loss. If you can't find the leak, you can assume it's from the evaporator coil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Will do. Big Blue is not expensive so will use instead of soap and water also. Cool.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top