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I'd drive as I do now, when I absolutely need to
I have mounted a basket on my bicycle,so I can carry small items
 

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get another job
 

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Get a job as a cable tech with me van is provided! :smile: Davandy and I have been paying thru the beek for gas anyway $1.08 a litre here.
 

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it would be a pretty long commute. Connecticut to Ontario?
 

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I just read this on Yahoo:

Where gasoline is cheap, and why it's making yours pricey
Friday May 4, 3:12 pm ET

By Steve Hargreaves, CNNMoney.com staff writer

In Saudi Arabia gasoline costs about 45 cents a gallon. In Iran it's 33. Venezuelans pay under a quarter.
These absurdly low prices are a direct result of massive government subsidies.

While these numbers are not adjusted for cost of living, it's fair to say that drivers in those countries are getting a good deal.

But it's straining government budgets. More importantly, it's not allowing the free market to do its job. Higher prices on the open market are not leading to a drop in demand, which is keeping the cost of oil high for everyone else.

"Roughly two-thirds of new oil demand is coming from countries that have subsidized oil markets," said Christopher Ruppel, a senior geopolitical analyst with the consulting firm John S. Herold. "So demand is not going to be affected if oil goes from $60 a barrel to $80."

By no means does this let motorists in the Untied States off the hook. Gasoline consumption in this country has been rising even faster than normal, around 2.5 percent annually over the last couple of months, despite average prices over $3 a gallon, close to an all-time record.

But countries where consumption is rising the fastest may be surprising.

With it's white hot economy, it's no surprise China tops the list. The country's oil demand is projected to grow 7.5 percent this year, according to statistics provided by Ruppel.

Ruppel said China still has gasoline subsidies, although lately the government has been trying to whittle them back. The average price for a gallon of gas in Beijing is $2.44 a gallon, according to the research group AIRINC, which provided all the gasoline price numbers in this story.

But the second highest demand growth isn't in the fast growing economies of India or Brazil. It's Saudi Arabia, projected to consume 5.6 percent more oil next year, according to Ruppel.

Iran is number three, guzzling 3.3 percent more.

Russia and Egypt, which Ruppel said both have heavy gas subsidies, are also high on the list.

And the raw numbers aren't small either. The Saudis used over 2 million barrels of oil per day in 2006, and the Iranians used 1.7 million. India, a faster growing economy with far more people, used 2.5 million. (By comparison, the U.S. used about 24 million barrels a day, nearly 10 times as much as India despite having a population nearly four times as small and an economy just three times bigger.)

"Maybe it's adding up," said Lou Pugliaresi, president of the Energy Policy Research Foundation.

Pugliaresi said his group hadn't done any particular studies on subsidies and how they relate to worldwide demand growth and prices, but added "There are places where it's serious, and some of those populations are big enough to make a difference."

Katherine Spector, head of energy strategy at J.P. Morgan, said the bank did a study on price supports and demand a couple years back. Not only was demand rising fastest in countries that had subsidies, it also greatly scaled back once the subsidies were reduced, such as in Thailand and Indonesia.

"A subsidy tells consumers they don't need to adjust their behavior," said Spector.

Of course, subsidies are just one factor contributing to high oil and gas prices, noted Adam Sieminski, chief energy economist at Deutsche Bank.

Sieminski pointed to all the the other reasons why oil prices are high, among them rapid worldwide economic growth, limited supply and not enough refining capacity.

But, he added "to the extend that it creates demand, it's helping push prices higher for everyone."
 

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Time to take the Suburban off the road, sell it, trade it, whatever. One more trip with it, and I'll have to consider, unless gas prices rescind again.
My Grand Prix has become very appealing lately, and I find Myself using it more frequently.
 

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It makes me appreciate my Duramax more everyday since diesel fuel is 2.89-3.09 a gallon in Washington compared to 3.29-3.49 for regular unleaded.
 

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It doesn’t matter what the price of gas is we will still drive the Suburban, we have to. It’s the farm work truck, it doesn’t matter what we get for mileage or what the price of gas is, we need to drive it to get feed,(can’t fit many bags of 88 lb bags of feed in the Fiero.

I don’t like it, the price going up, and up, and up.

But this is the life we have chosen to lead and to live the way we do we have to have the big vehicles.

We don’t have payments on anything we drive so that helps. We pay cash when we buy vehicles.
 

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Ditto on the cash payola for My vehicles. Have not had vehicle payments for a bunch of years, but I cannot see giving away my pension to the oil barrons.

I can make it right now, on one 4 wheeler, and My motorcycle for pleasure. Matter of fact, My bicycle does more daily miles than My MC.
 

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Ditto on the cash payola for My vehicles. Have not had vehicle payments for a bunch of years, but I cannot see giving away my pension to the oil barrons.

I can make it right now, on one 4 wheeler, and My motorcycle for pleasure. Matter of fact, My bicycle does more daily miles than My MC.
Many of us that own these behemoths, own them because they are the only thing capable of doing the jobs that we ask of them.

We do have a golf cart that we can use for most small scale jobs on the farm.

Our full size Ford (Forgive me) Vans we use for picking up hay, (30 square bales at a time, rain or shine).

But hauling the horse trailer is a Burb job. I have never driven anything that hauls better, has the power for the job, has the weight needed to handle the trailer towing without worrying about being pulled around by the trailer. Try doing that with a four wheeler.

I don’t mind the bad mileage, I just hate the gas prices, I know we are getting gouged at the pumps but what are we going to do?

I have been thinking of converting to alcohol, and brewing it myself though. She's old enough to drink, 13.
 

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Originally from an agricultural area for decades, and being directly involved with the heavy duty transportation industry, I viewed a mass of black clouds headed Our way during the last 8 years.

Fuel costs continued to plague My employer, and the price of raising vineyards began to escalate too. More and more vineyards were leaving the crops and collecting insurance, sometimes due to low sugar content, but also the cost to harvest and transport the crop became staggering. Ditto, on the citrus crop here in Florida.

The Wine industry is also under attack from low cost importers all over the world. Africa, Austrailia, South America for instance.
It seems that Bob Dylan's song.....Union Sundown has become much more of a reality since the 25 years (or so) passing, when recorded.

Personally, I'd love to see some technological break-thru for the farming community that would take the US/Canada out of the Oil Barrons wallet.
 

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I guess I needed an update from my earlier post. I bought diesel a few days ago for $3.99 a gallon. I will be using gasbuddy.com more often now to find the cheapest fuel in town.
 
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