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Discussion Starter #1
im thinking about putting 22 inch rims on my 2005 tahoe, besides for the $$$ factor, im reluctant b/c ive heard stories about upgrading your brakes and some sort of hasle w/ the tire pressure sensor.
has anyone gone threw the whole process, and was it a hassle?

thanks
-fred
1995 tahoe LT (rip)
2005 tahoe
 

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I have seen issues with larger wheels on cars and trucks. I work for a major Wheel Equipment Manufacturer and we come across this issue daily. The mass amount of people buying larger tires & Wheels have been driving the industry nuts. The larger the tire/wheel combination the larger the issue with the brakes. Are the OEM enough to stop the truck are they going to have an adverse effect on the ABS system? It all depends on the situation that causes you to stop suddenly. Normal driving and stopping isn't going to have that big of an impact, it is when you are required to stop suddenly though. Don't take me for an engineer, because I am not, this is just the info I get from my clients (real world experience). As for the Tire Pressure Sensors, I had put 20" reverse drop mount wheels on my 04' XL. It was a bear of a job but I did it, what was so hard was not breaking the sensors. They are very fragile and extream care must be taken when putting the tire back on the wheel. Calibrating the sensors was not a problem either, if you have the TPS calibration tool ($350).
 

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Good insight haellc. I guess larger wheel/tires combo will have some impact on brakes, etc. Are these long-term issues or do they pop up pretty quickly?
 

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Tire/wheel combo issues with the brakes are only popping up when customer is needed to stop suddenly. This is a potential long term problem. What we are hearing through the grapevine is the the DOT is going to at some point have to put a limit on tire/wheel combination, due to OEM braking system size.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
so it can be done, i just have to take into account emergency breaking.
not a problem, a friend of mine has z06 calipers and a hook up @ slp.
im just concerened about the air pressure sensors, is there any after market sensor that youve heard about??
id like to keep the stock wheels intack, and be able to swap them during inclement weather, and/or put them back on if i sell the truck.
as for the tps tool, is that similar to say the hypertech programmer??
if so ill do some reserch and look for softwear instead, and use my laptop instead of a stand alone unit.
thanks for the reply, i know this is actually a serious issue, and slappin 22's on your ride doesent mean its going to work right, i just see so many people, that have aftermarket rims and never hear of it being a hastle.

-fred
1995 tahoe LT (rip)
2005 tahoe
 

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You can buy replacement sensors from GM Parts or other mfg's they will reun anywhere from $120 to $240 for a set of 4. There are specified for your make and model. The TPS tool is a calibration tool for the new sensors to be able to talk to your truck, you can get it most likely where you get the sensors. Do you have a Myers Tire Supply, American Tire Distributors in your area (they would have them). So new sensors $240 at most and TPS (you have to use this tool to calibrate sensors) tool for about $350 total $600 roughly. I personaly used my stock sensors but was extreamly careful with them.
Many go and put on what ever they can get away with, but know that there are going to be some comprimises. I tried to put 20" on mine and didn't put sensors in at first, after severaly service tire pressure warings I put them in to eliminate possible trouble code issues.
 

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really? the DOT is going to get involved in it? What state, or the NTSB maybe for the feds?
 

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DOT, NTSB you know how the grapevine works. Sometimes specifics get mixed up. But at SEMA last year that was a big topic. Everybody understands that you take a vehicle and it comes from factory with 15 - 16" stock wheels and then put 20 - 24" weels on it, that you are going to encounter braking issues. When the question was asked how big are they going to go and most said 28 - 30 seems to be the limit.
Now this wheel size trend has driven the tire changer, balancer, and alignment manufactures nuts tring to keep up with products that cna handle that capacity. Hunter Engineering has done a great job of it, they have a machine that does the best job I have ever seen in solving "VIBRATION ISSUES". Go to www.gsp9700.com to find one near you. I bring this info up because these machine's cost about $15k and I know I would hate to buy one and find out they couldn't do all the wheels in the market (current wheel size cap. 30"). That kind of awnsers the question of how big are they going to get.
Back to the DOT/NTSB issue. There has NOT been any one agency saying that they are going to start policing this issue. It is just some industry leader saying that IT could happen and probably will, just don't know when. I personaly see them getting involved only if there becomes some serious accidents that occure, (NTSB would be my guess). That is my opinion.
Next time you are out look to see how many 80' - 90' model chevy caprices you can find that have 20 - 22" wheels on it. Then think about the braking system on it, how old the technology was that created that system and look at the ratio of brake rotor, caliper compared to wheel size.
Just some more thoughts.
 

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Good insight. This large wheel trend is interesting to say the least. They say that necessity is the mother in invention though.
 

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DOT, NTSB you know how the grapevine works. Sometimes specifics get mixed up. But at SEMA last year that was a big topic. Everybody understands that you take a vehicle and it comes from factory with 15 - 16" stock wheels and then put 20 - 24" weels on it, that you are going to encounter braking issues. When the question was asked how big are they going to go and most said 28 - 30 seems to be the limit.
Now this wheel size trend has driven the tire changer, balancer, and alignment manufactures nuts tring to keep up with products that cna handle that capacity. Hunter Engineering has done a great job of it, they have a machine that does the best job I have ever seen in solving "VIBRATION ISSUES". Go to www.gsp9700.com to find one near you. I bring this info up because these machine's cost about $15k and I know I would hate to buy one and find out they couldn't do all the wheels in the market (current wheel size cap. 30"). That kind of awnsers the question of how big are they going to get.
Back to the DOT/NTSB issue. There has NOT been any one agency saying that they are going to start policing this issue. It is just some industry leader saying that IT could happen and probably will, just don't know when. I personaly see them getting involved only if there becomes some serious accidents that occure, (NTSB would be my guess). That is my opinion.
Next time you are out look to see how many 80' - 90' model chevy caprices you can find that have 20 - 22" wheels on it. Then think about the braking system on it, how old the technology was that created that system and look at the ratio of brake rotor, caliper compared to wheel size.
Just some more thoughts.
Do I have to have something recalibrated to ad 22' rims and 305/40 tires to my '07 Avalanche, it has the economy fuel managment system v8-v4 mode? If so where????????????????????????????????????
 
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