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Discussion Starter #1
I am wondering if anybody has made there own headlight mod kit yet? The mod where both lights are one when the high beams are turned on. If it was warmer I would figure it out but being in the 20s during the days lately it is a little chilly. And no garage to work in.
May be I'll do a write up on it.

Tim
 

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There are several ways to do it. I have read this on another forum that I belong to. I forget what year your Burb is though so it might be different.
 

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I've been thinking about hand-building this mod. It doesn't look to be too difficult, and the parts list shouldn't be astronomical, I just haven't gotten around to building the circuit and testing. If/when I get around to it, I'll post the write-up. Britebox is another brand of box that'll do the job.
 

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It's easy -- go for it

I'm a newbie here, and this is my first post here, so please be gentile...

I'm a grandfather and don't see as well at night as I used to. So, when I upgraded to brighter (but legal) bulbs on the old 'Burb, I converted to "quad-high" as well. Late at night, on a deserted highway, it makes a quantum difference.

What I did:
With the new bulbs it seemed prudent to provide additional power for the quad set-up. Selecting the appropriate Bosch-type relay will provide everything you need to accomplish the desired switching. There are kits available, but they might not be exactly what you want. Add a wire, a fuse, and some connectors and you have all that's necessary.

1. Determine a good position for your relay -- closer to the headlights than the firewall and along the existing harness.

2. Select a power source and run a new, fused, wire to the relay area. Fish the headlight wires from the OEM convoluted cover.

Note: You have two mounting options with a Bosch relay: you can get a socket with pigtails, and plug the relay into the socket. Or, just get some female spade lugs, crimp and go. The socket also provides a mechanical anchor for the relay. The second method saves you from having to splice the socket's pig tails, but you'll have to anchor the relay directly (it has a screw hole). But, make sure there is enough slack in the existing wires if you're going with the pig-tailless method.

3. Connect to the relay as shown in the diagram. As you can see, this is a simple application of a SPDT relay. Here's what's happening: At low beam, the power passes thru the relay at it's "rest" position. When you switch to high beam, the high beam power is OEM except it's tapped to activate the relay. This provides the alternate power for the low beams without a cross-connection = quad light. With this set up, even if the relay fails or is removed, you'll still have light. :)


 

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:sign0016: That post was great. We're not really the newbie bashing type around here. What bulbs did you upgrade to?
 

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:sign0016: That post was great. We're not really the newbie bashing type around here. What bulbs did you upgrade to?
GP Thunder, Super-White 9006 55W & 9005 65W by Global Premier. They claim to be 7500K w/ quartz glass. The OEM's were 51W and 60W Sylvanias. I've run the new quads for several hours, and the lamp lenses don't get overly warm. :)
I just checked eBay, and they are now available for about half what I paid. :grrrrrr:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Zippy, don't you have the 87 and 87a reversed. Isn't the 87 always on and the 87a when the coil is energized? Great write up anyways, that is exactly the way I was thinking of doing it.

Tim
 

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i did this on the bronco and pulled power right from the battery for the lights and used the headlight wire as an signal wire. the power right from the batteries mkes the lights much brighter. the multi switch is busted on the suburban and both lights come on all the time and heat the switch up and you can smell the wires cooking.........so i got to fix that first....mike
 

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No problem

Zippy, don't you have the 87 and 87a reversed. Isn't the 87 always on and the 87a when the coil is energized? Great write up anyways, that is exactly the way I was thinking of doing it.

Tim
Tim,
I wasn't sure enough that I didn't have to double check...
First, let me clarify: I should have indicated that my diagram shows the low beam condition. When the relay coil is NOT energized, the flow is between 30 & 87a. This is the normal low beam situation.
When switched to high beam, the OEM high beam power, from the column switch, is tapped to trip the relay and still power the high beams. This is the condition when 30 is connected to 87, and the low beams are powered by the supplemental supply.
As I prefaced my response, I really couldn't remember which was which, 87 or 87a. Here's what I found (from several sources) to remind me what's going on...

Luckily, my original is correct. Typically, Bosch depicts relays as though the coil repels the connection at 87 -- your confusion is understandable.
Give the quad lights a try. If you're like me, when done, you're going to say: Duhh... That was so easy, why didn't I do it a long time ago?
FYI, A lot of time and effort went into this animated relay info site, check out: http://www.bcae1.com/relays.htm
Good luck, zippy
 

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Not fun

...the multi switch is busted on the suburban and both lights come on all the time and heat the switch up and you can smell the wires cooking...
Yikes... Don't you just hate it when that happens!
:grrrrrr:

Is it possible you've got gremlins in the instrument lights' potentiometer? Your directly powered headlights might back-feed the light switch and toast things up. When thinking headlights, it's easy to forget there's a lot more than just headlights going on in that switch.
Years ago, I had a '57 Dodge that had a haunted light switch. Unless you ran the instrument lights at full bright, the pot would get so hot you could burn your fingers on the switch's pull shaft. I don't think I ever fixed it, but I learned to run the dash lights on bright, and not burn my fingers.
 

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I used two 12v relay (one for the head light & one for the fog lights). Now all the bulbs stay on when I activate the hig beams
It's a lot cheaper & it works great.
 
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