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Just bought a 94 K2500 its got the 5.0L (not for long). Dont know where to find a identification tab anywhere and its a 16 bolt pan. Having problems shifting im thinking it a shift silinoid?
 

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No I can't, but what you can do is get the RPO codes off the lable in your glove box & go to ww.compnine.com & enter it & your vin # They will tell you what you have. If it turns out that you have the 700R4 you might want to have the throttle valve cable checked & adjusted because it is everything as far as fluid pressures & shifting.
 

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If it is a True 2500 (8bolt wheels) then you will have an early version of the 4L80E and if it is a light 2500 (6 bolt wheels) then you most likely have a 4L60E.
 

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Murdog is absolutely correct. One thing that is for sure is that it does NOT have a 700R4. Their use was discontinued in 1988 for pickups and 1991 in Suburbans.

If it does indeed have 16 bolts, it's a 4L60E. Refer to the chart below to compare the pan and determine the transmission:

 
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Nice diagram Christopher. That's a keeper. Why did they stop using them so early in pickups? They're plenty strong & seem to have fewer problems than their clone 4L60E brother..
 

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1988 is when GM moved the bodystyle from the 80s bodystyle to the 90s bodystyle for pickups. However, the Suburban stayed the old 80s bodystyle until 1991. With the bodystyle change came the movement from the 700R4 to the 4L60E. One of these days I'll write a nice explanation describing when why and how the bodystyle change occured...
 

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The 700r4 seemed to hold up well in 1/2 tons that didn't see much work. I think there are a few reasons why the 4l60 seems to have a bad rap. One is simply the tremendous popularity of GM pickups starting in the mid 90s. More 4L60s on the road, more broken 4L60s. The other likely contributor is the increase in power with the trucks, and 1/2 tons doing the work of 3/4s. Seems like everyone has a 30+ foot camper, big boat, 4 place snowmobile trailer, etc. Stuff we used to haul with full floaters and 4.10 gears, now we do with 3.42 gears. And the taller gears - for fuel economy - are a big hurt on the 4L60. Constant shifting,, quick to unlock the Torque Converter, etc.
 
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