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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For 15 years I have worked to keep rust at bay on my truck. It was washed and waxed regularly. In the winter I would be sure to run it through the car wash after a snow to get the road salt off.

Despite my efforts, rust has found me.

I discovered a 6-7 inch long strip of paint bubbling on a rear fender lip with faint signs of rust coming through.

Time for me to start making plans to repair it once the weather warms up. I am looking into possibly using either fiberglass reinforced filler or self-adhesive patch with body filler.

I just hope that once I start sanding away the damage it does not turn out to be so bad that it requires welding a patch as I do not have the equipment or the experience for that.
 

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I don't do body work (no space, no body tools, no knowledge); but from experience, the only way to fix that and have it last is a metal replacement. A new fender skin for "parts" (not a full fender, just a section), cut out the bad metal and use it as a template to cut a piece out of the new skin.
 

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using a cutoff tool and applying fiberglass you can make these repairs and do a good job with these products. then you can bring to paint shop for coloring the patched area. fiberglass will never rust again .tough thing about fiberglass is working temp/hardener ratios/personal protection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't do body work (no space, no body tools, no knowledge); but from experience, the only way to fix that and have it last is a metal replacement. A new fender skin for "parts" (not a full fender, just a section), cut out the bad metal and use it as a template to cut a piece out of the new skin.
If the rust spots are small enough (which I hope they are), there is no real need to cut out the good metal around it. Reinforced fiberglass filler will do the job. If on the other hand I find something like a 6x1 inch hole then I have to consider putting in metal replacement.

using a cutoff tool and applying fiberglass you can make these repairs and do a good job with these products. then you can bring to paint shop for coloring the patched area. fiberglass will never rust again .tough thing about fiberglass is working temp/hardener ratios/personal protection.
This is what I am hoping is all I need. As for the painting, I am considering using something like Dupli-Color Perfect Match or APS system. While it might be easier to take it to a shop, it would be time consuming for me, besides I would like to try to do the whole repair myself.
 

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sure you can use the dupli-color primers/base color coat/then top off with clear. using some 1K/2K/3K wet sanding it can look perfect.
just make sure you wash and sand that fiberglass real good before you prime it. use prep-sol cleaner before spraying the surface.

on the hole make sure all rusted metal is gone . hole now too big I have used stove/vent pipe cut to fit and use some rivets. use countersink rivets.
set in the bumps if necessary. then fiberglass the repair. finish off the fiberglass by topping it with some bondo .
my rocker panels came out perfect. had to do both sides.
make sure you allow the proper time for the cure !!!! no rushing it..
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
hole now too big I have used stove/vent pipe cut to fit and use some rivets. use countersink rivets. set in the bumps if necessary. then fiberglass the repair. finish off the fiberglass by topping it with some bondo . my rocker panels came out perfect. had to do both sides. make sure you allow the proper time for the cure !!!! no rushing it..
Thanks for the tip j cat. I really hope it is not so big that it requires metal replacement, but if it does, I suppose riveting is a viable option. I do have a pop-rivet tool.
 

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I cant believe it took 15 years for the cancer to find your truck!! I washed a 2003 I had religously throughout the winter and it litteraly rotted away. Starter became a huge chunk of rust because all the windshield water was routed onto it (thank you GM engineers)the transmission lines under the starter rotted out, and also the power steering line where its attached to the power steering reservoir rotted out. This was all in like 2008-9 when it was only 5-6 years old.
This is why my Phantom truck sits parked in the winter.:D No chance a catching cancer:eek: if im not exposing it to the sickness;)
not to mention that the underside of the floor boards are bare metal with no paint/undercoat on them. I guess its the purchasers job to have undercoated or painted if your in the road salt states.:mad:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sorry to hear about that phantom.

In all honesty, I did not do anything drastic. Like I said I just washed the truck regularly. We have a real good car wash near where I live that has a terrific undercarriage wash. When the chassis started exhibiting signs of surface rust, I took a wire wheel to it and brushed on 2 coats of flat black Rustoleum. The engine also gets washed about 4 times a year followed by Gunk Engine Engine Protector Shine.
 

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I bought my 2000 4X4 so I could get to work when the snow storms hit. This allowed me to make the big bucks. overtime around the clock.
I did the rust proofing and so far it has held up good ..not perfect but after 15 years no major rust. just the rockers in the rear area, this is because GM did not put water drain holes in the body sections of the rear area of the rockers.

Rustfre 1014 I think is the product used. It was/is a fiberglass petroleum based coating that still is working great. did all the areas that rust including those defective GM brake/tranny/oil lines made from Chinese steel crap.
I am very happy with the extra work I did almost 15 years ago to my new truck ,, since it paid off. still Looks new..

I do not wash my engine and I do not recommend this since , damage can occur. I would and do use air pressure to blow off any dirt.

down in the very warm areas now no cold or snow here. soon after several weeks with warm temps I will be back in the snow hell back home in MA...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have washed my engines for years with no problems. The trick is letting the de-greaser do the work and drying the electronics.

After spraying on the de-greaser and before rinsing it off I start the engine and leave it running as I hose it down. Minimize the water sprayed around the coil packs, spark plugs. When finished let the engine run until it had dried out. Follow up with Gunk Engine Engine Protector Shine or similar product to protect the plastic and rubber parts.
 
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