GM Truck Club Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 2002 Suburban with the 5.3L Flex Fuel Chevy Engine. I need to change the fuel filter. It looks like it is the original AC Delco GF626 filter. The outlet side of the filter had what GM calls the "Quick Connect - Metal Collar" fitting. It has a garter spring that holds the fuel line in place. I bought an Assenmacher AST8022 tool for removing "2002-04 Chevy Tahoe and Suburban" fuel filters. It looks like this tool will work fine with the replacement filter that I have bought (Purolator F55215).

The problem is the filter on the trunk right now. The AC Delco filter has a boss where the outlet fuel line goes on to the filter which PREVENTS the tool from seating against the fuel line and hence being able to disengage the garter spring.

Does anyone have any ideas short of cutting the old filter off? Is there a better tool than the one I have purchased?

Chevy OEM Parts
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,625 Posts
What kind of tool are you using? The plastic type that comes in different sizes, or the metal one that looks like a pair of scissor?

A picture of the offending part in the way may help us, as I am not familiar with this type of filter. I am familiar with the quick connect fittings though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,428 Posts
I like these from Lisle. Great for use in confined spaces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The first picture shows the filter now installed on the truck. Notice the "boss" on the output line which prevents the tool from sliding up and releasing the gater spreing int he quick disconnect fitting.

The second picture shows the tool I bought for removing the filter.

The last filter shows the replacement filter which does not have a "boss."

Thanks for your help.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,625 Posts
That boss looks more like just a rubber fuel line, or am I wrong?

If it is a quick release type fitting give it a little pull to see if it moves at all. The quick release fittings are made so they can be turned, and pulled a little when they are connected.

There are some that have a safety clip you have to remove before you can get the fitting to release but from your picture to me it looks like a rubber hose with an old still spring clip on it. If it is, and you can tell by just feeling around the hose for the spring release tangs. If it is just spin the hose around until you can get at the tangs, squeeze them together with a flat pair of pliers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The boss I'm referring to is on the filter itself. It is preventing my tool from seating against the outlet line. There are no release tangs on this version. The tool I have looks just like the one in the GM manual.

If the tool were just a little bit shorter, it would fit seat around the outlet line and I could release the garter spring. I just dislike cutting on a new tool!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
561 Posts
since you are not saving the old filter why not use a set of ***** to cut the old filter at the boss and then use needle nose plyers and the re-lease tool to get the nipple out?.
that hose should move back alittle more and your tool might get in but why fight it. cut remove and reinstall.
mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I found the tool to take the filter off. It's a Lisle 35000 "Fuel Filter Disconnect tool - GM." The two semi-circular pieces can slip over the "boss" on the filter and under the lip of the quick disconnect fitting. The handle then holds the two semi-circular pieces together, making it easy to dis-engage the quick disconnect fitting.

For what it's worth, the original filter was an AC Delco GF-644 filter. I can't find any reference anywhere to that filter. The owner's manual calls for a GF-626 and the current AC Delco catalog calls for a GF-481.

The filter has been changed and I should be good for 30,000 miles!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,428 Posts
cross references the number:
Search Results for GF644
Part Number.......Manufacturer..........WIX Part Number
GF644 ................ AC DELCO ................ 33623
For Reference Only. Check Vehicle Application Listing for Correct WIX Filter.

Chevy Parts
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the cross-reference, Unplugged. I'm sticking with Purolator - I know I can replace that filter easily!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have 2002 Suburban with the 5.3L Flex Fuel Chevy Engine. I need to change the fuel filter. It looks like it is the original AC Delco GF626 filter. The outlet side of the filter had what GM calls the "Quick Connect - Metal Collar" fitting. It has a garter spring that holds the fuel line in place. I bought an Assenmacher AST8022 tool for removing "2002-04 Chevy Tahoe and Suburban" fuel filters. It looks like this tool will work fine with the replacement filter that I have bought (Purolator F55215).

The problem is the filter on the trunk right now. The AC Delco filter has a boss where the outlet fuel line goes on to the filter which PREVENTS the tool from seating against the fuel line and hence being able to disengage the garter spring.

Does anyone have any ideas short of cutting the old filter off? Is there a better tool than the one I have purchased?

Chevy OEM Parts
Do not need any fancy or expensive scissor like tools to safely remove this filter, or a hacksaw which could create heat or sparks or get metal shavings in your fuel lines (I am amazed that a dealer would suggest this). Just get the standard OEM 25052 AC line removal kit at any AutoZone for about ten bucks, or even cheaper online if you aren't in too big a hurry. Take out the gray tool and cut it directly across from the existing split to form two mirror image parts. Twist/pull the metal fuel line housing back from the filter as far as it will go. Then work one half of the gray tool inside the metal fuel line housing, then work the other half in. Once they are both inside the clip housing and parallel to the outlet line on the filter, push the metal line housing towards the filter as far as it will go, then pull it back. It will pull out. Bottom line is, the two pieces of the removal tool do not need to be hinged or scissored together to work. Once they are both inside of the metal fuel line housing, the inside walls of the housing will hold them in place, and the metal bulge in the outlet line near the filter will keep it from moving too far backwards. Keep the new two piece gray line removal tool for future fuel filter removals, and use all the other assorted color line removal tools you will now have for other things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the tip. I ended up getting an Assenmacher 8022 tool which works quite well. I used a borrowed Lisle 35000 tool to remove the original filter. All subsequent filters have worked well with the Assenmacher.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top