GM Truck Club Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a newbie, I want to ask you guys something.

I want to buy a Classic Suburban ('77 - '82).
Not younger then '82, because in The Netherlands you don't pay tax for cars older than 25yrs! But that should I buy? 350, 454 or 6.2 diesel?
The 6.2 seems tempting, because of the fuel price (1.05 euro/liter) and economy, but is it any good? I want to drive it daily and I don't want to spend all my free time to keep my car running ;-) An other option is driving on (natural) gas (0.48 euro/liter) (don´t know what you call it, here it´s LPG, in france GPL).

Could you guys put some light on this, would be very nice! :great:

Greetz, Terp
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,625 Posts
Good luck finding part for something that old.

The diesel I know very little about except the first GM diesels were reworked gasoline engines and not very dependable. We had one in an 81 Impala and every time something went wrong it was very costly to have repaired, so unless you can do diesel engine work yourself I would stay away form them.

A lot of the local gas companies, natural gas companies convert to that LP gas because it cost them nothing to run them, the fuel is free. I have been told the conversion is not that hard or expensive but I have never done one so I will let those here who have try to help you.

There are a lot of Internet sites with the process but for the life of me I don’t know where.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ok, thx.
Conversion is not the problem, there are kits sold (in Holland) for it, special for big americans :glasses:
I want to know about reliability and durability and cost of repears and so on..

greetz, Terp
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,888 Posts
ok, thx.
Conversion is not the problem, there are kits sold (in Holland) for it, special for big americans :glasses:
I want to know about reliability and durability and cost of repears and so on..

greetz, Terp
First off, :sign0016:to the site!

That's great about not having to pay taxes on older cars. What's the availability of them though? I have seen people (or company fleets) convert to LPG with good results, but a loss of power. I've even seen police departments do this just for their cruisers (Seattle/Kirkland, WA -- Some in Dallas, TX) and they do ok becuase not all cars have the LPG, some are higher performace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,630 Posts
I think it's interesting that so many people complain about a loss of power on lpg/lng fueled engines. The reason they lose power is because the engine isn't tuned for that fuel. They slap a conversion kit on it, and then drive away, and get disappointed by the lack of power.

Yes, I'm going to hijack this thread, because this is important and needs to be said.
LPG/LNG both have the ability to be compressed greatly compared to gasoline/petrol. Much like a diesel. This is what give diesels that awesome twisty torque that they have.

If you're going to convert a gas/petrol engine to LPG/LNG then you need to take the proper steps to make it worth the conversion. The compression ratio should be brought up between 15 and 18:1. A Proper cam should be installed to take advantage of your new torque curve which is going to be drastically different from your previous curve. Any good cam grinding shop should be able to come up with an appropriate cam for lpg/lng fueled engine.

The mistake most people make is thinking in terms of BTU. While that may be fine to help you gauge the fuels output, it's the wrong thinking when it comes to "what can you do with that fuel" lpg/lng loves to be compressed. The more the merrier, but I'm thinking you couldn't go 21:1, but you could get close.

In the end a properly tuned lpg/lng engine should out perform a similar gasoline engine in torque. It won't be anything like a diesel, but it will make you glad you converted. If after all that you decide that you want a little more speed, you can always change your axle gear(s).

HOWEVER:
This leaves you with a dedicated lpg/lng engine only. That would be the only down side. You would NOT be running a multi fuel engine.

With respect to your engine questions. The 454 is hard to kill, but is like an alcoholic, you can't get it to stop drinking!
The 350 has a good foundation, and many of the replacement parts are inexpensive, at least in the states, since the engine is so widely produced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
The 6.2 diesel engine is a good *LIGHT DUTY* diesel engine. Meaning that if you just want to drive around, or haul light loads then it is great. But if you work it like it was a Cumins or Powerstroke then you will kill it pretty fast. GMs diesel engines were light duty engines until they started dropping in the Duramax. A lot of people dogged them without a just cause in my book because they heard the word diesel and automatically assumed GM built them to be heavy duty work horses when they in fact did not.

I believe the diesel engines in that point in time were NA instead of Turbo, which If I'm right is kinda a bummer but it still certainly isn't a bad choice.

None of those engines are a bad choice IMO to be honest with you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Thank you all!

Many Dutch 'Big American' drivers are driving on LPG because of the price/liter.
By law :rules: the car must also run on petrol, but there are several companies in Holland witch can adjust the engine to run well on both fuels.

I'm not gona use my car for heavy towing or something, ok I like to drive fast (no to fast :glasses: ) So If I understand you guys right: the 6.2 diesel can be suitable for my purpose. And the 454 is the hardest to kill, but likes it :sign0196:

Greetz, Terp
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Yea as long as your not towing anything over 8-10K lbs you can drive a 6.2L Diesel like you stole it 24/7 with no problems. With proper care and maintenance they will last you 300-500K miles easy and some have gone far more.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,457 Posts
First welcome to the site :sign0016:,

If you ask me I will say go for the 350 petrol
Diesel cost 1 Euro for a liter and you can count on it in the future they going to raise heavy taxes on diesel.
For that kind of engine a brand new LPG installation cost 2000 Euro you earn it back in no time :great:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Peter, Bedankt voor je opmerkingen.
Ik denk dat ze wel uitzonderningen gaan maken voor 'oude' diesels.
Ben er nog niet uit.

Greetz, Terp
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top