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Hey all,
New and looking for a good forum for info and friendly help. I've registered at a couple of different sites. Can't stand the ones where everyone bashes each other and tells people they are stupid, etc, etc.

I spend most of my forum time around my 99 Regal GS which, but I'm trying to get my truck on the road. I think I'm there but won't know for a day or so until I get fix a battery issue.

I have an 85 Chevy. It's got a 350 as far as I can tell. The truck has a bit of a story. I bought it off of a younger kid. He worked for a body shop so the paint and body is very good. The truck was actually pieced together from a few separate vehicles and not exactly sure on the motor. He said it had about 30k on it since rebuild, but no idea how many miles or anything. I just rebuilt the carburator yesterday. The carb is a 79 Rochester Quadrajet. We'll see how I did. Upon first start it fired like a champ(unlike before when I would try to start the truck), but fuel was spraying everywhere because I didn't have the fuel filter housing tightened properly. Haven't had a chance to try again due to battery issue, so we'll see soon.

I'll be searching around, but if any of you have links to threads I need, please post. I think I have the belts on correctly, but searching for over an hour on the internet I couldn't find a diagram for the accessory belts on this thing. Also, any links to how to adjust Rochester carburetor would be great. It's got an electric choke, but I think that it needs to be adjusted. Also have some minor electrical issues where the blinkers are dim on one side. Turn signal arm needs to be replaced I think.

 

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welcome to the club, that is a nice looking truck you have there ill look through the site and see if i can help with any links to threads that may help you
 

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Welcome to the club. Thats a sweet truck you have there.:great:
 

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That's a beaut. You never see 80's trucks around here without rust around the fenders. Welcome aboard.

PS - check out stephan, he's got a wealth of knowledge for these trucks and can probably help you.
 

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Welcome aboard!
And that is a SWEET looking truck for sure! here in MN you are lucky if you can find one that you cant see thru!
 

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Welcome to the club Glen. That's one sweet looking truck. Great choice of colors by the p.o.
On your turn signals being dim on one side, I would check the grounds front & rear on the bad side before you go to the trouble & expense of replacing the column switch. It can be something as simple as a bad contact at either of the bulbs, a dirty or corroded socket, or a loose ground wire.
On the leaky fuel inlet be sure you put the gasket in & that the old gasket wasn't stuck to the carb.
For adjusting the mixture, it's key to have both mixture screws out the same amount when you're done. Doesn't matter if they're 1 1/2 to 3 turns out as long as they're the same from side to side. Before starting adjustment, zero your screws. With engine off, Gently screw them in till they seat, then count 1 1/2 turns out on each one. When making adjustments, move both screws the same amount & keep track of the turns so they stay the same. Make sure your engine is completely warmed up, ignition timing is set, & set the carb idle down to 800-950 rpm, before you start making your air fuel adjustments. Use a tach & adjust them for highest rpm. If your idle rpm gets above 950, set it back down & then continue with the adj.
For the choke adj, you should do this after it has sat overnight & is completely cold. With engine off, open the throttle to release the choke linkage. Look & see where the choke flap is. If it's within 1/8" to 1/4" of being closed, then it doesn't need adjustment, but the fast idle speed screw might.
I would also check the compression on this engine just to get an idea of where you're at.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the tips.

The fuel issue was simply that I didn't have it screwed in. it was cross threaded. Fortunately the threads were not damaged so I just had to put it in properly.

As far as the carb adjustment, I'm not convinced that I even want to touch it. It seems to be good for now. We'll see.

How do you check compression? What tools are needed?

Also. I need to change the oil. What is recommended on these old beasts? 10W 30? Should I change out the differential oil? I just noticed that my front diff is leaking. How hard is that repair?

Thanks
 

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A compression check is easy & straight foreward & since you can do a carb rebuild you'll skate through a cc easy enough. A comp check simply checks your engines ability to pump & hold pressure. It checks the condition of the rings, cylinder walls & how well the valves are seating & sealing. You can get a good guage for between $20.-$40. You could rent or borrow one, but a comp guage is something you can use on any engine you'll ever have (except diesels, they use a different one) & it's best to always use the same guage on your engine as different guages can vary. To check it, warm your engine to full operating temperature, & remove the spark plugs. Guages have screw in adapters & also rubber plug in so use whichever is easier for you. Block your throttle wide open during the entire test. Don't keep opening & closing it for each cylinder or it will flood it & skew the comp readings. Have a helper crank the engine over 6 to 8 revolutions, your pressure may build in 4 or 5 so adjust accordingly. Watch the guage & see if the guage pressure builds fast for the first 1-3 revolutions (it should if they are in good shape) It should jump to 90-125 psi on the first couple revolutions, & then increase 15-20 psi up to the total for each cylinder (probably between 150-175 psi, it depends on your compression ratio & whether you have any carbon build up on the piston tops or in the combustion chambers.) Write them down & look for any big variations between cylinders. They should all be fairly close if there are no problems. SAVE this paper & put it in your glove box or with your guage as you will want it to compare it the next time you check it on your next tune up or maintenance. You will be able to identify problems the next time you check it, if your readings aren't the same.
OIL: I use 10-30, but you should use what ever is recommended for your engine & your climate where you live.
Is the diff leaking at the cover gasket, or the pinion shaft seal? If the gasket, go ahead & pull it off & put a new gasket on it, & fresh gear oil. If it's the pinion seal leaking, post back, as it's a little more involved because of the crush sleeve, & there are 2 different ways it can be done.

** If your battery is marginal, be sure & charge it up before doing your compression test. If it starts cranking slowly for the last few cylinders, they will read low & skew your test.
 

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1997 Chevy Cheyenne K3500, cc, lb, dly, dzl, 2002 Chevy Avalanche Z71, 2003 Chevy Avalanche Z66
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Welcome to the club!!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks stephan. The list of things to check is growing. Maybe you should quit responding. LOL. JK. I appreciate all of the help and quick responses. I'll have to look closer at where the diff is leaking. Battery is brand new.
 

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Welcome to th club Glendayle, I personally have always been a big fan of the older stlye chevy pick ups, great looking truck!
 

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Welcome to the G M T C !
 

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Welcome!.....
 
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