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I have a 1993 Suburban K1500. It's got a 350 with a 10-bolt rear end. I have a leaky pinion seal and housing seal so I am planning on replacing the seals in the very near future.

Problem is I need to know what to torque the pinion to after I replace the seal?? Can anyone help?

Thanks,
Zach
 

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10 bolt pinion torque spec

Fyi..................

from: chevyperformance.com

when assembling the pinion into place, include the crush sleeve between the two pinion bearings. This sleeve must be replaced every time the pinion nut is torqued. Many mechanics use an impact gun while others insist the nut should be torqued by hand. Either way, the nut should be tightened to produce 24-32-in-lb of torque to turn the pinion gear with a new bearing. This is without the ring gear in place.
 

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I have a 1993 Suburban K1500. It's got a 350 with a 10-bolt rear end. I have a leaky pinion seal and housing seal so I am planning on replacing the seals in the very near future.

Problem is I need to know what to torque the pinion to after I replace the seal?? Can anyone help?

Thanks,
Zach
You can replace the pinion seal without changing the crush sleeve. You have to do it a little differently though. First mark the position of the nut with a chisel or other method so you can tighten it back to exactly the same place. Next remove the nut and change the seal. Then use lock-tight on the threads and tighten the nut back to where it was. The trick is to get it tight as possible without crushing the sleeve any more then it already is crushed. This method works every time is done precisely as described. If the nut is loose then the crush sleeve must be changed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thats it?? 24-32 INCH pounds?? I thought the pinion nut would be more like 50-75 FOOT pounds? Is that really all it takes? I figured since the drive shaft has all that force going to the pinion, it would need a lot more than that...

Zach
 

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The inch pound rating is the force required to turn the pinion after the crush sleeve has been crushed.
The actual torque required to crush the sleeve is probably in the hundreds of foot pounds. I had to use a breaker bar, a pipe, and stand on it to crush that sleeve.
 

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Zach,

The torque setting is for checking the preload on the bearing. If you would like to get a new crush sleeve and crush it then we're talking over 100 ft lbs of torque.

Do you want to do this the easy way? If so forget about torque settings and do it the way I described in an earlier post.

If you want to use a torque wrench then buy a crush sleeve and pull the axles and carrier out. Then measure the existing torque it takes to turn the pinion shaft with an inch lbs torque wrench. This is the turning torque you want after changing the seal and reusing old pinion bearings. Any tighter than this will wipe out the old bearings real fast.
 

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Good info on this site from what I've seen so far, kudos. Here is my related question at almost 1 a.m. and torn down in driveway need to get to work...:
Tore down rear end looking for parasitic drag figured out pinnion but was loose a bit. Did visual inspection of all bearings and found nothing that raises an eyebrow. Now being ignorant to the crush sleeve until reading this post I started putting everything back together tightened the pinnion but too much I just didn't like how hard it was to turn so I backed it off backed off the yoke a bit until felt play then tightened the nut back on until I got what feels like 2lbs force to turn the pinnion. Now I'm guessing I give the nut a good smack with a chisel to make sure it doesn't back itself off again and then set the carrier and see if my gear mesh is acceptable. If it is am I good to go or did I screw up and have to buy a crush sleeve and both pinnion bearings and start from scratch? Sure would like to just button this thing up and get back to making money with it but if it is going to fail in catastrophic manner in 100 miles on the highway with 1000lb payload then I would like to know now. But my slightly educated and some experiance doesn't see why it shouldn't be ok. Anyone care to weigh in and tell me if I am totally screwed or not?
 

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There was quite a chance that you have crushed the sleeve beyond the preload spec to make it hard to turn.
When you backed the pinion nut off the yoke, now there will be a slight axial play. You need to measure how much is this axial play. Try to hit the yoke with a hammer at the pinion nut and try to push and pull the yoke and assess the amount of axial play. This amount of axial play will be the amount of backlash on the drive and coast side of the gears.
If its not too much, you can probably get away with putting it all back together but the taper bearing and races will not have a perfect contact and will cause it to fail later. The pinion seal might leak too because of the axial play. How long it will last, not sure.
 

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You can use this instead of the crush sleeve. Just get a couple sacrificial pinion bearings and open them up a little so you don't have to press them on and off the pinion and add/remove shims until you get the correct preload shown on page 2 of the set up manual.
 

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When I changed all the bearings in my suburban rear end, I bought the crush sleeve eliminator shims from Summit. I reused the old crush sleeve and just added a thin shim out of the set to be able to get the pinion preload using the old crush sleeve.
I also marked the pinion nut position relative to the pinion shaft before disassembly so I can have a reference point for reassembly.
I have driven my suburban about 20k miles after the rebuild and the rear end is still quiet.
It now has 280k miles and still drives like new.
 

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Here are the thin shims from the Summit crush sleeve eliminator. I was able to pull the old crush sleeve from the pinion gear shaft without damaging it, so I just reused it and added a 0.51mm shim to it. It saved me time and effort trying to crush a brand new crush sleeve.
166078
Crush sleeve eliminator 2.jpg
 

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There was quite a chance that you have crushed the sleeve beyond the preload spec to make it hard to turn.
When you backed the pinion nut off the yoke, now there will be a slight axial play. You need to measure how much is this axial play. Try to hit the yoke with a hammer at the pinion nut and try to push and pull the yoke and assess the amount of axial play. This amount of axial play will be the amount of backlash on the drive and coast side of the gears.
If its not too much, you can probably get away with putting it all back together but the taper bearing and races will not have a perfect contact and will cause it to fail later. The pinion seal might leak too because of the axial play. How long it will last, not sure.
Well it lasted about this long. Got the whine of death on deceleration just at now on way home. Going to tear it down and see what damage was done and pray they have parts in stock at the local zone when they open in couple hours.
 

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That's all fine and dandy but my pinnion was chewing it's way through the carrier and now I can't get the passenger side c clip to drop out. I've put a rachet strap to the axle, hit it with a hammer prayed from the inside but it won't budge enough for the c clip to clear the spider gear. Not sure what to do here but I know I'm looking at a boat load of parts I do not have the money for right now so not sure what the hell I'm going to do. They say ignorance is bliss but I say it's just damn expensive.
 
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