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Cheap Rotors are low grade steel which warps after u drive down that big hill ONCE. Look up grades of bolts: grade 5, grade 8, etc. are really tough. Buy a bolt from HFreight and watch. U can virtually c it erode away to nothing! I try using grade 8 which I believe has 6? Hash marks on the head, when replacing a stripped, etc. bolt or nut.
Correct. Grade 2 has no markings, Grade 5 has three (3) radial lines on the head, and Grade 8 has six (6) radial lines on the head. Metrics should be stamped with an 8.8, 10.9 or 12.9 on the head, as a reference. Some GM bolts are metric as you get to the newer models.
 

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Correct. Grade 2 has no markings, Grade 5 has three (3) radial lines on the head, and Grade 8 has six (6) radial lines on the head. Metrics should be stamped with an 8.8, 10.9 or 12.9 on the head, as a reference. Some GM bolts are metric as you get to the newer models.
Yes sir, and grade eight are anodized gold in color. Grade eight is the strongest bolts available to the public.
 

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my first place to look is rock auto, verify correct parts (many options) compare pricing, then compare same part to amazon and your local parts place offering quality parts.i have good luck with either powerstop or oem , and usually from amazon, because rock auto shipping and parts cost more than amazon
 

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I had very good luck with CrossDrilledRotors.com. They sell "American Made" high carbon rotors of all types Yes, they are somewhat expensive, but a night and day difference in brake stopping. Another area is Rock Auto.com

If you get cross drilled or slotted, know which side the rotor has to be mounted!!! See all these vehicle build programs and the rotors half the time are on the wrong side of the vehicle. Another thing to consider, use "ceramic American Made" brake pads instead of any metallic pad that wears the rotor down prematurely. Metallic pads can range from 35 to 65% metallic material. Higher metallic pad wears down rotors faster.

ALWAYS torque the wheel to the brake hub in a crisscross step torque pattern to the proper torque to avoid warping of the rotor on a rapid cool down.

As for rebuilt calipers, look at the length of the warranty on the caliper. Longer the warranty … better the caliper rebuild. Always change, not clean up the brake caliper mounting hardware. It's cheaper to replace than go through a second time repair dealing with a sticking caliper problem.

Flush the whole brake system if you see brown or black brake fluid. I myself use up to a half a gallon of brake fluid to push out every speck of contaminated brake fluid (moisture).

You pay for what you get !!!
 

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We have a 2010 Chevy Suburban 1500 and we are putting new calipers and rotors on the front. It is a daily and the person usually driving drives it like it is a small car,
my silverado will be 20 yrs old in april 2020. I still have the OEM factory front calipers. the work I DO is using the proper grease on the caliper pins/piston weather boot .MUST USE SILICONE BRAKE GREASE !!! A BIT EXPENSIVE !!!, the other cause on your problem is rotors get hot .. pads do have backing plate burrs.. then the pads will lock up. I some times had to file off the burrs on the backing plate so the pads set in place easy .. just use my fingers no tools.
I had to replace my rear rotors because the cal pistons were manufactured defective 24K miles on truck.. pistons not made from steel .. made out of a plastic type material pistons both had a distortion .. brakes pads worked good when new then the piston got stuck as it moved to the weather seal area.
b*tched to dealership they wanted me to pay for the pads.. no replacing of the calipers.. well I still have the ones I purchased 150K miles still working ..
the other reason front brakes have problems the rear brakes may have air in the fluid ..

my new truck is a Toyota . 3.5yrs old .. just did the tire rotations inspected the brakes . all the pads worn exactly the same . excellent quality . rotor surface on all looked like a mirror..
my 2000 silverado I had to replace rotors because of rust blisters. I replaced my rotors with wagner rotors. no distortions had the rust blisters.
when replacing /working on the brakes open the bleed screw port and push back the pistons all the way back so NO nasty brake fluid gets into the system...
put a hose on the port stick in a clear bottle with fluid in it .. then push the piston back then close the port .. then remove the hose in the bottle ..do one side at a time .good luck .
 

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Good point @j cat , the stamped steel of the pad plate should be filed to remove the stamping cut edge.
And add, just a little brake grease (yes use the silicone grease) on the ends of the pads. I just use enough to cover the file marks which will keep the steel from rusting. Too much and it will attract dirt.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Ok, so We replaced the calipers and rotors on the front because NAPA replaced them for free, so why not. We got heavy duty rotors and calipers this time, (for Fleet Vehicles Apparently) and got them on the 'Burb no trouble. We then went to bleed all the brakes, and one of the calipers a factory default and leaked all over the place, so we replaced that one as well (Napa also replaced for free). We went to bleed them again, and there was no bubbles. We took it for a test drive and NO brakes unless we pumped them up several times. Then it kind of stopped. We went to bleed them again, and again, straight to the floor and no brakes....
What are we doing wrong? Too bleed them we are opening the valve, then pressing and holding the pedal with the valve tube in a bucket of brake fluid, then closing and putting the pedal up and repeating the process. We were thinking about maybe we pump them up then hold and open the bleeder valve. Will that solve our Problem?
 

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The old way (before ABS) was to pump up the pedal, hold it and open bleed screw (crack it open only enough that the fluid and air come out). Hold pedal to the floor until the valve is closed and repeat.
Always starting with the farthest away (right rear) and work towards the closest (left front).

That's the old way!

The ABS way is to use a tech 2 tool, or use a vacuum pump at the bleed screw.

If you use the old way on ABS, you may/can cause an ABS operation which will lock out one, or more, ABS channels.

This is the same as a broken line, the ABS senses a lose of pressure and locks out that channel.

This has probably already happened to you and you need to reset the ABS.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
The old way (before ABS) was to pump up the pedal, hold it and open bleed screw (crack it open only enough that the fluid and air come out). Hold pedal to the floor until the valve is closed and repeat.
Always starting with the farthest away (right rear) and work towards the closest (left front).

That's the old way!

The ABS way is to use a tech 2 tool, or use a vacuum pump at the bleed screw.

If you use the old way on ABS, you may/can cause an ABS operation which will lock out one, or more, ABS channels.

This is the same as a broken line, the ABS senses a lose of pressure and locks out that channel.

This has probably already happened to you and you need to reset the ABS.
We fixed it!!!!!!! The dang NAPA gave us 2 drivers side calipers, so the bleeder screw was on the bottom on one of them, meaning all the air was trapped at the top. Fixed!!!!!! The pedal is no longer spongy and everything workes!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #30
The old way (before ABS) was to pump up the pedal, hold it and open bleed screw (crack it open only enough that the fluid and air come out). Hold pedal to the floor until the valve is closed and repeat.
Always starting with the farthest away (right rear) and work towards the closest (left front).

That's the old way!

The ABS way is to use a tech 2 tool, or use a vacuum pump at the bleed screw.

If you use the old way on ABS, you may/can cause an ABS operation which will lock out one, or more, ABS channels.

This is the same as a broken line, the ABS senses a lose of pressure and locks out that channel.

This has probably already happened to you and you need to reset the ABS.
Also, can you do it the old way on an ABS car? I think ours has ABS, and we were doing it the old way and it seemed to work fine..
Will it work even though we had ABS?
 

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Also, can you do it the old way on an ABS car? I think ours has ABS, and we were doing it the old way and it seemed to work fine..
Will it work even though we had ABS?
Sometimes with a repair job you can get away with the old way.
For example, the rear brakes haven't been touched, no air in the rear. Then the rear ABS system will have resistance to pressure.
And if the fronts only have calipers replaced (and new caliper have been loaded with fluid from supplier) then there is very little air in the system.
Under those conditions you should be ok using the old method.
The problem occurs when there is a total lose of pressure in one, or more channels.
You have 4 channels, one for each wheel (the older trucks have 3, left front, right front and rear).
 

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as for bleeding the brakes on an abs equiped vehicle, as long as you do not let the fluid get empty in resorvoir or any air in ABS module you can bleed it the old way . if air is allowed to get in ABS module , you will need a scan tool that can cycle the abs circuits to purge out the air.
 

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We fixed it!!!!!!! The dang NAPA gave us 2 drivers side calipers, so the bleeder screw was on the bottom on one of them, meaning all the air was trapped at the top. Fixed!!!!!! The pedal is no longer spongy and everything works!!!
you put on 2 driver side calipers >>>>>>>>>>... that is funny stuff.. bleed screw must be on top of caliper ... IMO air got into the system opening that caliper on the pass side .
I should have said before you do this work remove the ABS fuse so the the ABS valves will not open ..
when I did my ABS valve removal and the brake lines all I pulled out the ABS fuse.. then did all the work ... then when the brakes/abs worked perfect I then put back the ABS fuse because there was no air in the brake fluid ..also when you replace the calipers you keep the pedal down...that will not allow brake fluid to drain out of the master cylinder.....I did not have to go to dealership to have them do the bleeding of the ABS valve assy .. this is how it works .. no air will get into the ABS valve body.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Yup. The NAPA gave us a drivers side in a drivers side box and a driver's side in a passenger side box.🙄🙄
 
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