GM Truck Club Forum banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know there used to be 3 different ways to measure wattage. Peak, Peak-to-peak and RMS. Am I wrong or did the tv/radio/stereo industry used to use peak then went to P-to-P in the last ten years?

I have a 15 year old RCA (Matsushi ta rebrand) stereo that was built around 1992 or 1993. It's rated on the front as 100 watts + 100 watts (front and back) for a total of 200 watts. However, this thing THUMPS, it's almost good enough to run a house party or DJ a small club. That leads me to think that it's 200 watts peak (400 p-to-p). I'm not sure why the root-mean-squared method came about, I figured it was a marketing ploy to give a higher number.

Anyone have an answer to this? I'd like to sell my stereo but it's hard to convince people that it's mega powerful 200 watt system when they can get a 200 watt system for $150 at Walmart that is peak-to-peak 200 watts.

... or am I all wrong? It's been years since I took physics and electronics in high school.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
If you have the Model number and stuff i think i could be of more help but this is what i can give you for now.

All the new stereos now use RMS and or max peak wattage for the stereo. the older p to p is something that i really don't know that much about. the root mean square(RMS) actually gives u the average running wattage of the stereo. it would in fact give u a lower number that the peak wattage. so if the RMS is 200 watts then the peak power is 400 watts.

BTW if u want a crazy powerful stereo system check out Z-5500 its 505RMS and 1010 Max wattage, it comes with a 10" sub.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top