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I have an 2005 suburban, about three years ago it started this tea kettle whistle on the front passenger side when it was cold out, pitch and intensity of the whistle changes when you press on the gas and depends how hard your on the gas.The first winter with this noise it would whistle and stop once the truck warmed up (thought no big deal it’s an older truck). The second winter with this noise it would whistle then there would be this pop noise (it would cause everyone in that vehicle to jump cause it was loud), but it would quit and be quiet the rest of the drive. Then now into the third winter with this noise and it is still there and now it is constant it does not stop when truck is warm, it still occasionally will pop but then returns to whistling. We thought it was speakers so we replaced those, I’ve turned the heat off and it is still there so I don’t think it’s blower motor. It sounds like it is in the location by the tweeter or the vent right on top by dash and windshield. Any ideas?
 

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Well when I read the first half of your post, I thought it was an exhaust leak; then realized you were talking about an inside noise.

If you think it's a radio noise, pull the radio fuse to see if it goes away.

Ditto if you think it's the blower motor.
 

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2000 Silverado Z71 4x4 5.3L 460k+ miles w/ GM rebuilt motor and trans
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Shot in the dark: Do you have a cracked windshield behind the dash and below the exterior trim?

Thermal expansion would explain the noise difference in summer vs. winter. The pop could be the larger gap allowing the glass sheets to move past each other and internal tension being released. Air movement from the engine compartment would change how air flows across the whistle...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Shot in the dark: Do you have a cracked windshield behind the dash and below the exterior trim?

Thermal expansion would explain the noise difference in summer vs. winter. The pop could be the larger gap allowing the glass sheets to move past each other and internal tension being released. Air movement from the engine compartment would change how air flows across the whistle...
no crack in the windshield (had that replaced in 2018 after tornado damage). Just followed the reply above and pulled stereo and the noise stopped so it’s connected to the stereo system some how...???
 

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Shot in the dark: Do you have a cracked windshield behind the dash and below the exterior trim?

Thermal expansion would explain the noise difference in summer vs. winter. The pop could be the larger gap allowing the glass sheets to move past each other and internal tension being released. Air movement from the engine compartment would change how air flows across the whistle...
Well when I read the first half of your post, I thought it was an exhaust leak; then realized you were talking about an inside noise.

If you think it's a radio noise, pull the radio fuse to see if it goes away.

Ditto if you think it's the blower motor.
well pulling the radio fuse stopped the noise but not sure how or where to start on correcting the issue. It is an aftermarket system that was professionally installed and didn’t have issues the first winter with it..??
 

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It could be a poor ground somewhere
Does the noise change with engine speed?
Does the vehicle need to be moving?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It could be a poor ground somewhere
Does the noise change with engine speed?
Does the vehicle need to be moving?
The pitch and intensity of the noise changes when you press on the gas and a little on how hard you press on the gas but it’s there when your parked or moving it doesn’t matter as long as it is on.
 

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So it could be engine noise being picked up through a poor connection (cats whisker).
Check and re-solder all joints..
Are the speaker wires inside shielded cable?
If they are, be sure only one end of the wire has the shield grounded
 

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So it could be engine noise being picked up through a poor connection (cats whisker).
Check and re-solder all joints..
Are the speaker wires inside shielded cable?
If they are, be sure only one end of the wire has the shield grounded
^^^X2. Improper grounds can cause all kinds of issues. How old are your plug wires?

You can also try ferrite chokes to eliminate engine noise. There's different sizes available on this link.

 

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2000 Silverado Z71 4x4 5.3L 460k+ miles w/ GM rebuilt motor and trans
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So, to further contribute to the wild possibilities... My truck radio changes inputs when I turn on my headlights from radio interference caused by my HID kit. I think they actually replicate the signal my radio remote sends since it changes to the same input every time. Any other aftermarket electronics on your rig beyond the radio?
 

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I have this same issue in my 2007 Honda Accord. The whistle only starts at around 60 mph and only when foot on gas. I just read a thread on an Accord forum where a guy solved his whistle by replacing his alternator. His theory was that the alternator bearing(s) were making the noise. Poor guy tried everything. I'm gonna check bearings when its warm out by removing the serpentine belt and spinning each bearing.
 

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If the radio is picking up the noise it isn't bearings, it needs to be electrical for the radio to "hear" it.
However, it could have been an electrical problem in the alternator.
 

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Some things to look at
First off, cheap radios do not have protection from conducted noise....
This noise comes from the alternator. Especially if the alternator has a bad diode. You get ripple, and it is rpm dependent.
You can 'scope the alternator out put and look at the ripple, although the battery acts as a filter.
In addition you may want to filter the power input to the radio with a low pass filter comprising a choke and a (high quality) capacitor (i.e 470-1000uF).

edit; meant 1000 microfards (vs 100)
 

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I have an 2005 suburban, about three years ago it started this tea kettle whistle on the front passenger side when it was cold out, pitch and intensity of the whistle changes when you press on the gas and depends how hard your on the gas.
Passenger side only! Coming out of the right side speakers? The problem is the radio. What happen if you change the balance to the left side only? Alternators do not make or cause a whistle noise. Have you put your ear to the speaker?

Does the radio have the problem with the engine off and the ignition in a AUX position? If yes it is the radio, if no the alternator is a suspect. If it is putting out an RFI, as mentioned above, that a diode could be bad in the alternator and you're not getting a clean DC voltage but you would see this when the headlights are on. They would get brighter as you accelerate.

Cheap radios of the past when aftermarket radios hit the scene (1960's) to have 8 track and FM radio started the whine noise from RFI issues really got bad at times. It got worse when GM had the HEI distributors and it was common to get a whine noise from the radio. In weak signal areas even stock radios would put out that whine noise.

However, since temperature seem to affect it, good old fashion transistors are still used for high output wattage can get temperature sensitive. Usually when hot they quit completely and when cooled off they work again.

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