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I just purchased a 2500 HD with the Duramax deisel. Love the truck but when I went out for a beach cruise I sank quickly. I had to drop the tire pressure down to 25 psi to manage the loose stuff. The stock tires are smooth on the road but useless in the NC surf. Anybody have any tire suggestions? I'd like to keep the stock wheels if possible. Thanks for any and all beach driving advice!
 

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Sand is always a trickly problem. I've spent my time in sand dunes and on different beaches across the country, sand it a tough beast to conqure.

From what I've experienced, there are three ways to get through sand. 1) Get paddle tires of some type. Check out sandtires.com and you'll see what I mean. 2) Go as big and wide as possible for your tires. This helps to create float, but it's not for every vehicle. 3) Let the air loose to create more surface space for the tire to ride on. It's not going to hurt your rims unless you drive off the sand very far once you leave the beach.

 

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Thanks for the input...

I don't think I want to go through the $$ to swap out wheels so I think I'm going to be limited to stock size tires. Any thoughts on good A/T instead of LT tires? Would I notice much difference?

Thanks!
Bob
 

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I would think going to anything wider than the stock tire width would help keep you on top of the sand instead of digging.
 

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What year truck, and what size tire do you currently have? Wheel fitment (is that a word) is a function of year/make/model/body style, and the width/backspacing of your existing wheels.
 

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Sand has always been a problem for the entire history of the automobile.

It has to do with the total footprint that is on the surface of the sand compared with the total vehicle weight. Basicly, sand-designed tires will help, but not solve the problem of sand. Your goal is to stay on top of the sand, not dig in, that's why worn tires will do much better than brand new knobbies.

I read that during WWII German troop carriers in North Africa actually had no-tread baloon tires and they did well in the sand. After that, the paddle tire came out for heavier vehicles and the dune-buggy came into existance as an ultra lightweight way to get though the sand, so the larger tires don't have as much weight on them.
 

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On my wife's 2001 Suburban, we have 18" 50 series A/T tires and have had it in the sand several times on the Washington coast without any probs. My 2006 Siverado 2500HD has 20" wheels with the same 50 series A/T tires on them (305/50/R20 to be exact) and I'll bet I won't have any probs as well. Def. go with wider.
 

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you can run bigger than stock tires on stock rims.....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
What year truck, and what size tire do you currently have? Wheel fitment (is that a word) is a function of year/make/model/body style, and the width/backspacing of your existing wheels.
Ya,I guess that info would help. I have a 2007 2500 HD Classic. The stock tires are 245/75/16. Thanks!
 

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I have a 2 wheel drive GMC sierra 2500. The stock tires for that are 245 70 R16. I have 265 75 R16 on there now with no problem. I'm not sure how much bigger you would want to go because then u have to worry about the tires rubbing. However I'm pretty sure that its recomended to lower tire pressure for sand. I know in Cape Cod we usually go down to between 16 and 20psi. Hope that helps. Oh by the way im running Cooper Discoverer ST's.
 

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These are some great suggesions. The only thing I'd like to add, is if you think you'll need to air down on occassion, and you're even a little handy you might want to consider this mod for your rig. It's a mod that's typically done to a jeep, but it's still do-able on any other truck.
http://www.offroaders.com/info/tech-corner/project-cj7/project-cj7-onboard-air.htm
convert an old York AC compressor to an air compressor for onboard air.

The york compressor has it's own oil reservoir so the compressor doesn't rely on the freon for lube.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Tires for sand...

Thanks for all the good info. My take is that aggressive A/T tires aren't the way to go. They just dig you deeper into the sand making recovery difficult. Wider is better and that it is possible to put slightly wider tires on the stock rims??

Airing down to as low as 16 psi (normal for stock tires is 50 for the front and 80 for the back) will increase the foot print without losing the seal around the tire.

I guess I'm off to the tire store.
Thanks again!

Bob
 

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im currently looking at tires for the same reason.. sand! i was looking at going from 265 70 r16 to 285 75 r16.. any suggestions.. i found a nitto tire and a yokahama tire..

has anyone put large tires on and "cut/removed" pieces to stop/prevent tire rub?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I've seen many posts from Folks that run much larger tires...

I believe you're going to have to reprogram the computer for the larger size tires. Your ABS and transmission are wheel size dependent.
 

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well it sounds like you have a 2wd but for the 4x4 guy we have had a lot of luck with the xterains although they wear really bad on the road so I dont know that these are a good solution. but they are amazing in river silt, sand and mud.
 

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One of the reasons I have my Yukon is so I can go surf fishing , So driving on the beach is pretty important to me ...

The Best advice I can give is AIR DOWN ...A compressor is probably a better investment than tires , especially for a daily driver.. Good sand tires make a bad run to work on Monday
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Air Down

One of the reasons I have my Yukon is so I can go surf fishing , So driving on the beach is pretty important to me ...

The Best advice I can give is AIR DOWN ...A compressor is probably a better investment than tires , especially for a daily driver.. Good sand tires make a bad run to work on Monday
I agree with CAFS...since I started this thread I've been out on the beach several times. I find that if I drop down to 20 psi I get through even the deepest sand. I'll saving my $$ and stick with the stock tires. As far as adding a compressor, maybe in time. For now I bring a 125psi tank (7 gallons) and inflate the tires enough to get me to a service station.
 

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I'm not sure how much bigger you would want to go because then u have to worry about the tires rubbing.

I went to 285/75/16's

Only rubbing is when wheel is cranked to it's stops eother left or right. Slight rubbing in foward motion with wheel cranked but more noticable rubbing in reverse. I took a exacto knife and trimmed 3/4" off the front fender well material and that took care of the rubbing all together in Drive or reverse.

I run on the beach all the time in Florida and with my tires I have only dropped the PSI by 10 (form 63 to 53) and have had no problems getting around. I keep a DC compressor in the bed under the bed cover to pump them back up.

Good luck
 

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Bridgestone Dueler A/T Revos - period

I have a set of these on my 98 Tahoe 4wd. Quite honestly the BEST tires I've EVER bought. No matter what I throw at these tires, they're incredible: hard corners, highway cruising, towing, snow, rice, rain, SOFT SAND, mud, playing in the rocks in Sedona ... INCREDIBLE, I'm telling you.

I was playing in the soft sand at Playa Bonita in Rocky Point, Mexico and didn't even have to air down - and I've got Load rating E tires with STIFF sidewalls. Same thing when I went to Gordons Well in Yuma, Ca to play in the sand at the dunes - pressure still sitting at 65psi from towing my trailer down, but went everywhere I wanted to without even a hint of concern. Granted, I didn't try to climb The Wall, or anything, but I could have EASILY have taken it back into the dunes and towed a sand rail back - I felt THAT good about them.

DO NOT think the standard Dueler A/Ts are the same. They're NOT. The REVOS have a distinctive tread pattern that makes ALL the difference.

When the tires on my 2004 Sierra 2500HD go bad, I'm putting the Revos on - nothing else will even be considered.

Respectfully,
 
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